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politicalbetting.com » Blog Archive » The Great Corbyn leader rating divide

SystemSystem Posts: 5,841
edited November 2015 in General

imagepoliticalbetting.com » Blog Archive » The Great Corbyn leader rating divide

With question marks still hanging over voting intention polling there’s been a lot more focus on leader ratings which seemed to have performed far better as voting indicators at GE2015.

Read the full story here


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Comments

  • TheScreamingEaglesTheScreamingEagles Posts: 64,263
    edited November 2015
    Interesting analysis Mike
  • RobDRobD Posts: 31,828
    Of course Tories are bloody satisfied with Corbyn's performance. Consigning Labour to the electoral dust bin of history ;)
  • kle4kle4 Posts: 29,626
    Ouch for those favourability numbers.
  • RobD said:

    Of course Tories are bloody satisfied with Corbyn's performance. Consigning Labour to the electoral dust bin of history ;)

    Just imagine how satisfied with Corbyn you must be if you're a Tory who sells/produces popcorn?
  • RobDRobD Posts: 31,828

    RobD said:

    Of course Tories are bloody satisfied with Corbyn's performance. Consigning Labour to the electoral dust bin of history ;)

    Just imagine how satisfied with Corbyn you must be if you're a Tory who sells/produces popcorn?
    The strategic reserve is running low... prices can only go one way!
  • Scott_PScott_P Posts: 35,300

    Just imagine how satisfied with Corbyn you must be if you're a Tory who sells/produces popcorn?

    Yes, Mr Chairman, we are predicting a 5000% increase in demand, for an investment of just £3
  • Don't Unseat Jeremy Corbyn Association!

    #DUJCA
  • Chris_AChris_A Posts: 955
    I'm astounded the US government spends more public money on health than we do.

    Perhaps the NHS haters on here can explain why if the NHS is so bloated, inefficient, filled with useless managers, etc that we do so amazingly well on a pittance and achieve similar or better outcomes to countries which spend far more.


  • TomTom Posts: 272

    RobD said:

    Of course Tories are bloody satisfied with Corbyn's performance. Consigning Labour to the electoral dust bin of history ;)

    Just imagine how satisfied with Corbyn you must be if you're a Tory who sells/produces popcorn?
    Genius. First thing to make me smile today after west ham's supine performance.
  • Sean_FSean_F Posts: 20,666
    FPT Dawkins & co. I suppose it's the complete - for want of a better term - paranoia, about religious practice that grates with me. Someone who equates taking a child to church with child abuse is frankly unhinged.
  • RobD said:

    RobD said:

    Of course Tories are bloody satisfied with Corbyn's performance. Consigning Labour to the electoral dust bin of history ;)

    Just imagine how satisfied with Corbyn you must be if you're a Tory who sells/produces popcorn?
    The strategic reserve is running low... prices can only go one way!
    A very naive and dangerous assumption if meant seriously (which I don't think it was). The unthinkable can happen. Just as a former Scottish Labour MP or Lib Dem one. An electoral bloodbath on those scales is not likely but not unimaginable either.
  • Philip_ThompsonPhilip_Thompson Posts: 12,784
    edited November 2015
    Sean I'd have no objection to this particular advert being shown at cinemas. But cinemas have a long standing blanket policy not to show political or religious adverts to avoid risking upsetting customers. I respect their right to make that decision. Sorry if you've already answered it but do you?

    So long as they are consistent and ban all such material then fair enough. If it was just this while others were being allowed it would be a much bigger deal.
  • RobDRobD Posts: 31,828

    RobD said:

    RobD said:

    Of course Tories are bloody satisfied with Corbyn's performance. Consigning Labour to the electoral dust bin of history ;)

    Just imagine how satisfied with Corbyn you must be if you're a Tory who sells/produces popcorn?
    The strategic reserve is running low... prices can only go one way!
    A very naive and dangerous assumption if meant seriously (which I don't think it was). The unthinkable can happen. Just as a former Scottish Labour MP or Lib Dem one. An electoral bloodbath on those scales is not likely but not unimaginable either.
    Ah, I wasn't referring to odds, just to be clear :p
  • Sean_F said:

    FPT Dawkins & co. I suppose it's the complete - for want of a better term - paranoia, about religious practice that grates with me. Someone who equates taking a child to church with child abuse is frankly unhinged.

    Depends on the disposition of the priest?
  • Ogh debunks Dr Eoin tweeting corbynites to focus on Ipsos mori..

    Heart of stone
  • RobDRobD Posts: 31,828
    Chris_A said:

    I'm astounded the US government spends more public money on health than we do.

    Perhaps the NHS haters on here can explain why if the NHS is so bloated, inefficient, filled with useless managers, etc that we do so amazingly well on a pittance and achieve similar or better outcomes to countries which spend far more.


    I'm not sure that the chart shows why the Doctors are striking.
    Also didn't that recent report (commonwealth?) say the NHS was pretty dire at patient outcomes?
  • RobD said:

    Of course Tories are bloody satisfied with Corbyn's performance. Consigning Labour to the electoral dust bin of history ;)

    Just imagine how satisfied with Corbyn you must be if you're a Tory who sells/produces popcorn?
    "I'm sick and tired of popcorn!" :lol:
  • #coys.. huzzah

    Still 5th mind you
  • glwglw Posts: 4,197
    RobD said:

    I'm not sure that the chart shows why the Doctors are striking.

    Yeah we spend more than the OECD average, and more the Spain and Italy which as far as I know have decent healthcare. To my eyes the thing that stands out is that our private sector is relatively small, perhaps we need to expand that alongside some rationing of less essential NHS services to encourage people to go private.
  • #coys.. huzzah

    Still 5th mind you

    "We are not worthy" :)
  • Chris_AChris_A Posts: 955
    RobD said:

    Chris_A said:

    I'm astounded the US government spends more public money on health than we do.

    Perhaps the NHS haters on here can explain why if the NHS is so bloated, inefficient, filled with useless managers, etc that we do so amazingly well on a pittance and achieve similar or better outcomes to countries which spend far more.


    I'm not sure that the chart shows why the Doctors are striking.
    Also didn't that recent report (commonwealth?) say the NHS was pretty dire at patient outcomes?
    It was OECD and said it was dire at some things - most notably preventing illness and cancer survival rates. And guess what? Public Health which was transferred to local councils by the mad Lansley will be slashed by Osborne ever further on Wednesday.

  • RobDRobD Posts: 31,828
    edited November 2015
    Chris_A said:

    RobD said:

    Chris_A said:

    I'm astounded the US government spends more public money on health than we do.

    Perhaps the NHS haters on here can explain why if the NHS is so bloated, inefficient, filled with useless managers, etc that we do so amazingly well on a pittance and achieve similar or better outcomes to countries which spend far more.

    twitter.com/EconBizFin/status/668467999653892096/photo/1

    I'm not sure that the chart shows why the Doctors are striking.
    Also didn't that recent report (commonwealth?) say the NHS was pretty dire at patient outcomes?
    It was OECD and said it was dire at some things - most notably preventing illness and cancer survival rates. And guess what? Public Health which was transferred to local councils by the mad Lansley will be slashed by Osborne ever further on Wednesday.

    I thought health funding was ring fenced?
  • Dunno how spurs failed to score 10 today vs Olympic Ham
  • FloaterFloater Posts: 5,488
    Chris_A said:

    I'm astounded the US government spends more public money on health than we do.

    Perhaps the NHS haters on here can explain why if the NHS is so bloated, inefficient, filled with useless managers, etc that we do so amazingly well on a pittance and achieve similar or better outcomes to countries which spend far more.


    You have a strange definition of "better"

    I wasn't going to mention this, but I think your post warrants it.

    Mother in law in hospital.

    Conflicting stories about what is wrong from staff which is bad enough, but...... today wife and her sister visited hospital and the two nurses on duty that they spoke to had a poor understanding of English.

    There were also problems yesterday and my sister in law had to insist nurses check something (nurses said everything was ok and that a certain thing had happened) - Check revealed that no, this was not the case.

    The NHS is not a religion and it certainly is not best in class.

    BTW - this pittance that you get by on, put a number to it.



  • RobDRobD Posts: 31,828

    Dunno how spurs failed to score 10 today vs Olympic Ham

    PB Tories can only have so much luck in any one day :)
  • glwglw Posts: 4,197
    edited November 2015
    Chris_A said:

    I'm astounded the US government spends more public money on health than we do.

    The USA has no national healthcare system, but multiple systems that cover some of the most expensive parts of the population. Medicare (the elderly), Medicaid (low incomes), the VHA (military veterans), the MHS (serving military), between them they spend a fortune, and there are probably some other big programmes I've forgotten. It is a barmy system of healthcare.
  • TheScreamingEaglesTheScreamingEagles Posts: 64,263
    edited November 2015

    Dunno how spurs failed to score 10 today vs Olympic Ham

    Because you don't have Jurgen Klopp managing Spurs. That's why.

    Liverpool scored four past the league leaders despite not starting the match with any strikers.
  • U

    Dunno how spurs failed to score 10 today vs Olympic Ham

    Because you don't have Jurgen Klopp managing Spurs. That's why.

    Liverpool scored four past the league leaders despite not starting the match with any strikers.
    We softened em up a few weeks ago for you..
  • Chris_AChris_A Posts: 955
    RobD said:

    Chris_A said:

    RobD said:

    Chris_A said:

    I'm astounded the US government spends more public money on health than we do.

    Perhaps the NHS haters on here can explain why if the NHS is so bloated, inefficient, filled with useless managers, etc that we do so amazingly well on a pittance and achieve similar or better outcomes to countries which spend far more.

    twitter.com/EconBizFin/status/668467999653892096/photo/1

    I'm not sure that the chart shows why the Doctors are striking.
    Also didn't that recent report (commonwealth?) say the NHS was pretty dire at patient outcomes?
    It was OECD and said it was dire at some things - most notably preventing illness and cancer survival rates. And guess what? Public Health which was transferred to local councils by the mad Lansley will be slashed by Osborne ever further on Wednesday.

    I thought health funding was ring fenced?
    DoH funding was but as it has gone up less in the last 5 years than for decades and is falling as a percentage of GDP. Public Health (that's initiatives to tackle obesity, alocohol and drug abuse, smoking, treating of STIs) was transferred to councils - that wasn't ring fenced and has been slashed.

    Also social care (social workers, modifications to housing to get people home, hole helps, meals on wheels etc) are also local council and have been for some time. That is also coming under strain and as a result the number of patients who are medically fit for discharge but cannot be discharged because of social issues has risen 20% in the last yer and is at the highest level ever. And we already have far, far fewer hospital beds to start with than many other European countries.
  • Interesting analysis Mike

    I agree. Looking over the numbers, you have to feel that Mike is right about the wording. 'Favourable' has much less ambiguity to it than 'satisfied' or even 'doing well'.
  • Dunno how spurs failed to score 10 today vs Olympic Ham

    Because you don't have Jurgen Klopp managing Spurs. That's why.

    Liverpool scored four past the league leaders despite not starting the match with any strikers.
    Hammers still 6th mind :)
  • TomTom Posts: 272
    Doesn't everyone win at Man City?
  • Talking of polls, Currant Bun have a pretty shocking one on their front page.
  • U

    Dunno how spurs failed to score 10 today vs Olympic Ham

    Because you don't have Jurgen Klopp managing Spurs. That's why.

    Liverpool scored four past the league leaders despite not starting the match with any strikers.
    We softened em up a few weeks ago for you..
    Nah. Klopp is a genius. He's the George Osborne of the football world.
  • Chris_AChris_A Posts: 955
    glw said:

    RobD said:

    I'm not sure that the chart shows why the Doctors are striking.

    Yeah we spend more than the OECD average, and more the Spain and Italy which as far as I know have decent healthcare. To my eyes the thing that stands out is that our private sector is relatively small, perhaps we need to expand that alongside some rationing of less essential NHS services to encourage people to go private.
    Includes countries such as Chile, Mexico, Turkey.

    Spain and Italy do do better than us for life expectancy. Both have far more doctors per capita than us.
  • Dunno how spurs failed to score 10 today vs Olympic Ham

    Because you don't have Jurgen Klopp managing Spurs. That's why.

    Liverpool scored four past the league leaders despite not starting the match with any strikers.
    Hammers still 6th mind :)
    Wonder how long we've got to say Chelsea are the worst PL London team?? Next Sunday is already worrying me, it's the hope that ruins my normal equilibrium...
  • Interesting analysis Mike

    I agree. Looking over the numbers, you have to feel that Mike is right about the wording. 'Favourable' has much less ambiguity to it than 'satisfied' or even 'doing well'.
    The other aspect to this is Miliband had poor leader ratings, yet he consistently led Labour to 40% plus in the polls/and double digit leads.

    Can Corbyn do the same ?
  • AndyJSAndyJS Posts: 21,371
    Belgian press conference starting now...
  • Chris_A said:

    glw said:

    RobD said:

    I'm not sure that the chart shows why the Doctors are striking.

    Yeah we spend more than the OECD average, and more the Spain and Italy which as far as I know have decent healthcare. To my eyes the thing that stands out is that our private sector is relatively small, perhaps we need to expand that alongside some rationing of less essential NHS services to encourage people to go private.
    Includes countries such as Chile, Mexico, Turkey.

    Spain and Italy do do better than us for life expectancy. Both have far more doctors per capita than us.
    Despite less state funding as your graph shows. Why is that and what lessons can we learn from them?
  • Dunno how spurs failed to score 10 today vs Olympic Ham

    Because you don't have Jurgen Klopp managing Spurs. That's why.

    Liverpool scored four past the league leaders despite not starting the match with any strikers.
    Hammers still 6th mind :)
    Wonder how long we've got to say Chelsea are the worst PL London team?? Next Sunday is already worrying me, it's the hope that ruins my normal equilibrium...
    I believe IOS has already called the match for Chelsea.

    Something to do with Chelsea's superior ground game. :lol:
  • Interesting analysis Mike

    I agree. Looking over the numbers, you have to feel that Mike is right about the wording. 'Favourable' has much less ambiguity to it than 'satisfied' or even 'doing well'.
    The other aspect to this is Miliband had poor leader ratings, yet he consistently led Labour to 40% plus in the polls/and double digit leads.

    Can Corbyn do the same ?
    Yes Yes for one word, swap tory for Labour then it's all good.
  • AndyJSAndyJS Posts: 21,371
    Chris_A said:

    I'm astounded the US government spends more public money on health than we do.

    Perhaps the NHS haters on here can explain why if the NHS is so bloated, inefficient, filled with useless managers, etc that we do so amazingly well on a pittance and achieve similar or better outcomes to countries which spend far more.


    Maybe the other health services are even more bloated and inefficient than the NHS is?
  • Chris_AChris_A Posts: 955
    AndyJS said:

    Chris_A said:

    I'm astounded the US government spends more public money on health than we do.

    Perhaps the NHS haters on here can explain why if the NHS is so bloated, inefficient, filled with useless managers, etc that we do so amazingly well on a pittance and achieve similar or better outcomes to countries which spend far more.


    Maybe the other health services are even more bloated and inefficient than the NHS is?
    Certainly the US one is.
  • FrancisUrquhartFrancisUrquhart Posts: 27,383
    edited November 2015
    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/entertainment-arts-34894250

    Laughable...according to Hall back in the good old days of 20 years ago the BBC independence was unquestionable, now politics has got involved.
  • FloaterFloater Posts: 5,488
    AndyJS said:

    Belgian press conference starting now...

    can you post main details - We have a communal dish for tv in my area ( to avoid unsightly dishes!) and the fecking thing broke Saturday morning.

    Thank god for Netflix and Amazon prime
  • Chris_AChris_A Posts: 955

    Chris_A said:

    glw said:

    RobD said:

    I'm not sure that the chart shows why the Doctors are striking.

    Yeah we spend more than the OECD average, and more the Spain and Italy which as far as I know have decent healthcare. To my eyes the thing that stands out is that our private sector is relatively small, perhaps we need to expand that alongside some rationing of less essential NHS services to encourage people to go private.
    Includes countries such as Chile, Mexico, Turkey.

    Spain and Italy do do better than us for life expectancy. Both have far more doctors per capita than us.
    Despite less state funding as your graph shows. Why is that and what lessons can we learn from them?
    Well it's the Economist's graph. The answer is probably in the second sentence. We need more staff and we have to stop people becoming unwell in the first place. Treating easily preventable illness - diabetes, hypertension, obesity etc is expensive.
  • AndyJSAndyJS Posts: 21,371
    edited November 2015
    Floater said:

    AndyJS said:

    Belgian press conference starting now...

    can you post main details - We have a communal dish for tv in my area ( to avoid unsightly dishes!) and the fecking thing broke Saturday morning.

    Thank god for Netflix and Amazon prime
    16 arrests, 19 houses raided across Brussels. Main suspect not among them.
  • Belgian police have made 16 arrests in anti-terror raids in Brussels, prosecutor confirms, but fugitive Salah Abdeslam is not among them.
  • Tim_BTim_B Posts: 7,057
    bloated and inefficient it may be, but you can always get a doctor's appointment the next day, an MRI within 24 hours, and if you need a procedure you get to choose your date - which you know won't get changed.

    You also get to choose your doctor, your surgeon and your hospital.

    United Healthcare, the country's largest health insurer, has said it may withdraw from Obamacare after it lost $400 million on it this year. So it may end up being a tad less bloated. Obamacare has been a disaster for the US healthcare system.
    Chris_A said:

    AndyJS said:

    Chris_A said:

    I'm astounded the US government spends more public money on health than we do.

    Perhaps the NHS haters on here can explain why if the NHS is so bloated, inefficient, filled with useless managers, etc that we do so amazingly well on a pittance and achieve similar or better outcomes to countries which spend far more.


    Maybe the other health services are even more bloated and inefficient than the NHS is?
    Certainly the US one is.
  • notmenotme Posts: 2,371
    Chris_A said:

    RobD said:

    Chris_A said:

    RobD said:

    Chris_A said:

    I'm astounded the US government spends more public money on health than we do.

    Perhaps the NHS haters on here can explain why if the NHS is so bloated, inefficient, filled with useless managers, etc that we do so amazingly well on a pittance and achieve similar or better outcomes to countries which spend far more.

    twitter.com/EconBizFin/status/668467999653892096/photo/1

    I'm not sure that the chart shows why the Doctors are striking.
    Also didn't that recent report (commonwealth?) say the NHS was pretty dire at patient outcomes?
    It was OECD and said it was dire at some things - most notably preventing illness and cancer survival rates. And guess what? Public Health which was transferred to local councils by the mad Lansley will be slashed by Osborne ever further on Wednesday.

    I thought health funding was ring fenced?
    DoH funding was but as it has gone up less in the last 5 years than for decades and is falling as a percentage of GDP. Public Health (that's initiatives to tackle obesity, alocohol and drug abuse, smoking, treating of STIs) was transferred to councils - that wasn't ring fenced and has been slashed.

    Also social care (social workers, modifications to housing to get people home, hole helps, meals on wheels etc) are also local council and have been for some time. That is also coming under strain and as a result the number of patients who are medically fit for discharge but cannot be discharged because of social issues has risen 20% in the last yer and is at the highest level ever. And we already have far, far fewer hospital beds to start with than many other European countries.
    can you show me department of health funding falling as percent of gdp?
  • AndyJSAndyJS Posts: 21,371
    edited November 2015
    Why is it expensive to prevent diabetes? The answer is for people to stop eating unhealthy food, advice that costs nothing.
    Chris_A said:

    Chris_A said:

    glw said:

    RobD said:

    I'm not sure that the chart shows why the Doctors are striking.

    Yeah we spend more than the OECD average, and more the Spain and Italy which as far as I know have decent healthcare. To my eyes the thing that stands out is that our private sector is relatively small, perhaps we need to expand that alongside some rationing of less essential NHS services to encourage people to go private.
    Includes countries such as Chile, Mexico, Turkey.

    Spain and Italy do do better than us for life expectancy. Both have far more doctors per capita than us.
    Despite less state funding as your graph shows. Why is that and what lessons can we learn from them?
    Well it's the Economist's graph. The answer is probably in the second sentence. We need more staff and we have to stop people becoming unwell in the first place. Treating easily preventable illness - diabetes, hypertension, obesity etc is expensive.
  • AndyJSAndyJS Posts: 21,371
    The Sun: "1 in 5 British Muslims have sympathy for ISIS, 1 in 4 young British Muslims".
  • GeoffMGeoffM Posts: 6,071

    Chris_A said:

    glw said:

    RobD said:

    I'm not sure that the chart shows why the Doctors are striking.

    Yeah we spend more than the OECD average, and more the Spain and Italy which as far as I know have decent healthcare. To my eyes the thing that stands out is that our private sector is relatively small, perhaps we need to expand that alongside some rationing of less essential NHS services to encourage people to go private.
    Includes countries such as Chile, Mexico, Turkey.

    Spain and Italy do do better than us for life expectancy. Both have far more doctors per capita than us.
    Despite less state funding as your graph shows. Why is that and what lessons can we learn from them?
    @Chris_A
    DoH funding was (you mistyped "is") but as it has gone up less (you mistyped "is continuing to go up") in the last 5 years than for decades and is falling as a percentage of GDP.

    Falling as a percentage of GDP? That's a wonderful way of saying that the economy is booming. Thanks for the vote of confidence in George Osborne, I'm sure he'll appreciate it!
  • Chris_A said:

    Chris_A said:

    glw said:

    RobD said:

    I'm not sure that the chart shows why the Doctors are striking.

    Yeah we spend more than the OECD average, and more the Spain and Italy which as far as I know have decent healthcare. To my eyes the thing that stands out is that our private sector is relatively small, perhaps we need to expand that alongside some rationing of less essential NHS services to encourage people to go private.
    Includes countries such as Chile, Mexico, Turkey.

    Spain and Italy do do better than us for life expectancy. Both have far more doctors per capita than us.
    Despite less state funding as your graph shows. Why is that and what lessons can we learn from them?
    Well it's the Economist's graph. The answer is probably in the second sentence. We need more staff and we have to stop people becoming unwell in the first place. Treating easily preventable illness - diabetes, hypertension, obesity etc is expensive.
    It's the graph you have chosen to highlight. That graph shows that the nation's you've chose to highlight as being better receive less state funding than our NHS does. So if state funding isn't the problem what is? The lack of private funding?

    When I lived in Australia in the nineties they tried a policy of encouraging tax breaks for private medical care as it was cheaper for the state to do that than to pay for the whole treatment. Meaning the state resources could be better managed on those who needed it. Yet here if someone is able to fund private care actually doing some is viewed as a form of apostasy not a good deed.
  • Chris_AChris_A Posts: 955
    AndyJS said:

    Why is it expensive to prevent diabetes? The answer is for people to stop eating unhealthy food, advice that costs nothing.

    Chris_A said:

    Chris_A said:

    glw said:

    RobD said:

    I'm not sure that the chart shows why the Doctors are striking.

    Yeah we spend more than the OECD average, and more the Spain and Italy which as far as I know have decent healthcare. To my eyes the thing that stands out is that our private sector is relatively small, perhaps we need to expand that alongside some rationing of less essential NHS services to encourage people to go private.
    Includes countries such as Chile, Mexico, Turkey.

    Spain and Italy do do better than us for life expectancy. Both have far more doctors per capita than us.
    Despite less state funding as your graph shows. Why is that and what lessons can we learn from them?
    Well it's the Economist's graph. The answer is probably in the second sentence. We need more staff and we have to stop people becoming unwell in the first place. Treating easily preventable illness - diabetes, hypertension, obesity etc is expensive.
    It's not. It's the treating of it that's expensive.

    Advice and education is cheaper but budgets are being cut, and the Tories leap up and down screaming "nanny state" at any meaningful health initiatives re tax on unhealthy food, or unhealthy lifestyle choices.
  • Y0kelY0kel Posts: 2,124

    Belgian police have made 16 arrests in anti-terror raids in Brussels, prosecutor confirms, but fugitive Salah Abdeslam is not among them.

    Thats because he is driving right now.
  • notmenotme Posts: 2,371
    AndyJS said:

    The Sun: "1 in 5 British Muslims have sympathy for ISIS, 1 in 4 young British Muslims".

    That correlates with the opinion polling of 26% of british muslims who thought the charlie hebdo attacks were justified.
  • notme said:

    AndyJS said:

    The Sun: "1 in 5 British Muslims have sympathy for ISIS, 1 in 4 young British Muslims".

    That correlates with the opinion polling of 26% of british muslims who thought the charlie hebdo attacks were justified.
    I wonder what proportion of white Labour voters thought the same? The leader seems to and he's not a Muslim.

    Blaming all Muslims for terrorism is like blaming all musicians for Justin Bieber.
  • RobDRobD Posts: 31,828

    notme said:

    AndyJS said:

    The Sun: "1 in 5 British Muslims have sympathy for ISIS, 1 in 4 young British Muslims".

    That correlates with the opinion polling of 26% of british muslims who thought the charlie hebdo attacks were justified.
    I wonder what proportion of white Labour voters thought the same? The leader seems to and he's not a Muslim.

    Blaming all Muslims for terrorism is like blaming all musicians for Justin Bieber.
    Where were all Muslims blamed for terrorism?
  • MikeKMikeK Posts: 9,053
    Good nightb but lets have some fun before we sleep:

  • GeoffMGeoffM Posts: 6,071
    edited November 2015

    notme said:

    AndyJS said:

    The Sun: "1 in 5 British Muslims have sympathy for ISIS, 1 in 4 young British Muslims".

    That correlates with the opinion polling of 26% of british muslims who thought the charlie hebdo attacks were justified.
    I wonder what proportion of white Labour voters thought the same? The leader seems to and he's not a Muslim.

    Blaming all Muslims for terrorism is like blaming all musicians for Justin Bieber.
    Everyone is equally guilty of allowing the horror that is Justin Bieber.
  • notmenotme Posts: 2,371

    notme said:

    AndyJS said:

    The Sun: "1 in 5 British Muslims have sympathy for ISIS, 1 in 4 young British Muslims".

    That correlates with the opinion polling of 26% of british muslims who thought the charlie hebdo attacks were justified.
    I wonder what proportion of white Labour voters thought the same? The leader seems to and he's not a Muslim.

    Blaming all Muslims for terrorism is like blaming all musicians for Justin Bieber.
    who blamed all muslims? Fortunately i only need to blame one in four. Just remember. One in four of those lovely diverse muslims you see, want to bring the UK into a caliphate.
  • FloaterFloater Posts: 5,488
    AndyJS said:

    Floater said:

    AndyJS said:

    Belgian press conference starting now...

    can you post main details - We have a communal dish for tv in my area ( to avoid unsightly dishes!) and the fecking thing broke Saturday morning.

    Thank god for Netflix and Amazon prime
    16 arrests, 19 houses raided across Brussels. Main suspect not among them.
    Thanks

  • Tim_BTim_B Posts: 7,057
    Y0kel said:

    Belgian police have made 16 arrests in anti-terror raids in Brussels, prosecutor confirms, but fugitive Salah Abdeslam is not among them.

    Thats because he is driving right now.
    I didn't even know he played golf ;)

    On a serious note it's quite amazing how Belgium has gone - in 9 days - from being a faceless host of the EU to a pariah state breeding muslim terrorists for ISIS, with an incompetent looking police and security force. Probably an unfair charge but that's how it looks.
  • notmenotme Posts: 2,371
    Chris_A said:

    AndyJS said:

    Why is it expensive to prevent diabetes? The answer is for people to stop eating unhealthy food, advice that costs nothing.

    Chris_A said:

    Chris_A said:

    glw said:

    RobD said:

    I'm not sure that the chart shows why the Doctors are striking.

    Yeah we spend more than the OECD average, and more the Spain and Italy which as far as I know have decent healthcare. To my eyes the thing that stands out is that our private sector is relatively small, perhaps we need to expand that alongside some rationing of less essential NHS services to encourage people to go private.
    Includes countries such as Chile, Mexico, Turkey.

    Spain and Italy do do better than us for life expectancy. Both have far more doctors per capita than us.
    Despite less state funding as your graph shows. Why is that and what lessons can we learn from them?
    Well it's the Economist's graph. The answer is probably in the second sentence. We need more staff and we have to stop people becoming unwell in the first place. Treating easily preventable illness - diabetes, hypertension, obesity etc is expensive.
    It's not. It's the treating of it that's expensive.

    Advice and education is cheaper but budgets are being cut, and the Tories leap up and down screaming "nanny state" at any meaningful health initiatives re tax on unhealthy food, or unhealthy lifestyle choices.
    There are very very few 'unhealthy foods'.
  • Tim_BTim_B Posts: 7,057

    notme said:

    AndyJS said:

    The Sun: "1 in 5 British Muslims have sympathy for ISIS, 1 in 4 young British Muslims".

    That correlates with the opinion polling of 26% of british muslims who thought the charlie hebdo attacks were justified.
    I wonder what proportion of white Labour voters thought the same? The leader seems to and he's not a Muslim.

    Blaming all Muslims for terrorism is like blaming all musicians for Justin Bieber.
    - or Rolf Harris, or Boy George, or the Bay City Rollers, or little Jimmy Osmond, or.... it's an endless list
  • Tim_BTim_B Posts: 7,057
    notme said:

    Chris_A said:

    AndyJS said:

    Why is it expensive to prevent diabetes? The answer is for people to stop eating unhealthy food, advice that costs nothing.

    Chris_A said:

    Chris_A said:

    glw said:

    RobD said:

    I'm not sure that the chart shows why the Doctors are striking.

    Yeah we spend more than the OECD average, and more the Spain and Italy which as far as I know have decent healthcare. To my eyes the thing that stands out is that our private sector is relatively small, perhaps we need to expand that alongside some rationing of less essential NHS services to encourage people to go private.
    Includes countries such as Chile, Mexico, Turkey.

    Spain and Italy do do better than us for life expectancy. Both have far more doctors per capita than us.
    Despite less state funding as your graph shows. Why is that and what lessons can we learn from them?
    Well it's the Economist's graph. The answer is probably in the second sentence. We need more staff and we have to stop people becoming unwell in the first place. Treating easily preventable illness - diabetes, hypertension, obesity etc is expensive.
    It's not. It's the treating of it that's expensive.

    Advice and education is cheaper but budgets are being cut, and the Tories leap up and down screaming "nanny state" at any meaningful health initiatives re tax on unhealthy food, or unhealthy lifestyle choices.
    There are very very few 'unhealthy foods'.
    But there are plenty that are high in sodium, in calories, in fat - or all three.
  • notme said:

    notme said:

    AndyJS said:

    The Sun: "1 in 5 British Muslims have sympathy for ISIS, 1 in 4 young British Muslims".

    That correlates with the opinion polling of 26% of british muslims who thought the charlie hebdo attacks were justified.
    I wonder what proportion of white Labour voters thought the same? The leader seems to and he's not a Muslim.

    Blaming all Muslims for terrorism is like blaming all musicians for Justin Bieber.
    who blamed all muslims? Fortunately i only need to blame one in four. Just remember. One in four of those lovely diverse muslims you see, want to bring the UK into a caliphate.
    Bit of a stretch to turn 1 in 5 have some sympathy for ISIS to 1 in 4 want to turn the UK into a caliphate. That's before you even get into the credibility of the polling in the first place.
  • Tim_B said:

    notme said:

    Chris_A said:

    AndyJS said:

    Why is it expensive to prevent diabetes? The answer is for people to stop eating unhealthy food, advice that costs nothing.

    Chris_A said:

    Chris_A said:

    glw said:

    RobD said:

    I'm not sure that the chart shows why the Doctors are striking.

    Yeah we spend more than the OECD average, and more the Spain and Italy which as far as I know have decent healthcare. To my eyes the thing that stands out is that our private sector is relatively small, perhaps we need to expand that alongside some rationing of less essential NHS services to encourage people to go private.
    Includes countries such as Chile, Mexico, Turkey.

    Spain and Italy do do better than us for life expectancy. Both have far more doctors per capita than us.
    Despite less state funding as your graph shows. Why is that and what lessons can we learn from them?
    Well it's the Economist's graph. The answer is probably in the second sentence. We need more staff and we have to stop people becoming unwell in the first place. Treating easily preventable illness - diabetes, hypertension, obesity etc is expensive.
    It's not. It's the treating of it that's expensive.

    Advice and education is cheaper but budgets are being cut, and the Tories leap up and down screaming "nanny state" at any meaningful health initiatives re tax on unhealthy food, or unhealthy lifestyle choices.
    There are very very few 'unhealthy foods'.
    But there are plenty that are high in sodium, in calories, in fat - or all three.
    But we are now told they aren't unhealthy in a balanced diet with exercise.
  • kle4kle4 Posts: 29,626
    edited November 2015

    notme said:

    notme said:

    AndyJS said:

    The Sun: "1 in 5 British Muslims have sympathy for ISIS, 1 in 4 young British Muslims".

    That correlates with the opinion polling of 26% of british muslims who thought the charlie hebdo attacks were justified.
    I wonder what proportion of white Labour voters thought the same? The leader seems to and he's not a Muslim.

    Blaming all Muslims for terrorism is like blaming all musicians for Justin Bieber.
    who blamed all muslims? Fortunately i only need to blame one in four. Just remember. One in four of those lovely diverse muslims you see, want to bring the UK into a caliphate.
    Bit of a stretch to turn 1 in 5 have some sympathy for ISIS to 1 in 4 want to turn the UK into a caliphate. That's before you even get into the credibility of the polling in the first place.
    The credibility of the polling point may be valid, it may not, but if someone has sympathy for Isis I dont see why they deserve the distinction, if they have one, from supporting the full aims of Isis. Some organisations and ideologies are so vile you cannot be a little bit sympathetic to them as if you can ignore the vileness. We would not forgive someone with nazi sympathies because they don't support everything the nazis stood for.

    Good night all.

    Yes, I went Godwin on this. But people cannot divorce the reality of is from some some abstract sympathy with various grievances or vague statements, and we should not allow people to pretend that either.
  • Tim_BTim_B Posts: 7,057
    It's a classic 'if' comment - they are not unhealthy IF you eat a balanced diet and exercise regularly. But those who eat a regular fast food diet - and that's really what we are talking about here - are probably on the poorer side of society and thus less likely to exercise regularly or eat a balanced diet.

    Tim_B said:

    notme said:

    Chris_A said:

    AndyJS said:

    Why is it expensive to prevent diabetes? The answer is for people to stop eating unhealthy food, advice that costs nothing.

    Chris_A said:

    Chris_A said:

    glw said:

    RobD said:

    I'm not sure that the chart shows why the Doctors are striking.

    Yeah we spend more than the OECD average, and more the Spain and Italy which as far as I know have decent healthcare. To my eyes the thing that stands out is that our private sector is relatively small, perhaps we need to expand that alongside some rationing of less essential NHS services to encourage people to go private.
    Includes countries such as Chile, Mexico, Turkey.

    Spain and Italy do do better than us for life expectancy. Both have far more doctors per capita than us.
    Despite less state funding as your graph shows. Why is that and what lessons can we learn from them?
    Well it's the Economist's graph. The answer is probably in the second sentence. We need more staff and we have to stop people becoming unwell in the first place. Treating easily preventable illness - diabetes, hypertension, obesity etc is expensive.
    It's not. It's the treating of it that's expensive.

    Advice and education is cheaper but budgets are being cut, and the Tories leap up and down screaming "nanny state" at any meaningful health initiatives re tax on unhealthy food, or unhealthy lifestyle choices.
    There are very very few 'unhealthy foods'.
    But there are plenty that are high in sodium, in calories, in fat - or all three.
    But we are now told they aren't unhealthy in a balanced diet with exercise.
  • Chris_AChris_A Posts: 955
    notme said:

    Chris_A said:

    AndyJS said:

    Why is it expensive to prevent diabetes? The answer is for people to stop eating unhealthy food, advice that costs nothing.

    Chris_A said:

    Chris_A said:

    glw said:

    RobD said:

    I'm not sure that the chart shows why the Doctors are striking.

    Yeah we spend more than the OECD average, and more the Spain and Italy which as far as I know have decent healthcare. To my eyes the thing that stands out is that our private sector is relatively small, perhaps we need to expand that alongside some rationing of less essential NHS services to encourage people to go private.
    Includes countries such as Chile, Mexico, Turkey.

    Spain and Italy do do better than us for life expectancy. Both have far more doctors per capita than us.
    Despite less state funding as your graph shows. Why is that and what lessons can we learn from them?
    Well it's the Economist's graph. The answer is probably in the second sentence. We need more staff and we have to stop people becoming unwell in the first place. Treating easily preventable illness - diabetes, hypertension, obesity etc is expensive.
    It's not. It's the treating of it that's expensive.

    Advice and education is cheaper but budgets are being cut, and the Tories leap up and down screaming "nanny state" at any meaningful health initiatives re tax on unhealthy food, or unhealthy lifestyle choices.
    There are very very few 'unhealthy foods'.
    But many unhealthy diets.
  • Tim_BTim_B Posts: 7,057
    kle4 said:

    notme said:

    notme said:

    AndyJS said:

    The Sun: "1 in 5 British Muslims have sympathy for ISIS, 1 in 4 young British Muslims".

    That correlates with the opinion polling of 26% of british muslims who thought the charlie hebdo attacks were justified.
    I wonder what proportion of white Labour voters thought the same? The leader seems to and he's not a Muslim.

    Blaming all Muslims for terrorism is like blaming all musicians for Justin Bieber.
    who blamed all muslims? Fortunately i only need to blame one in four. Just remember. One in four of those lovely diverse muslims you see, want to bring the UK into a caliphate.
    Bit of a stretch to turn 1 in 5 have some sympathy for ISIS to 1 in 4 want to turn the UK into a caliphate. That's before you even get into the credibility of the polling in the first place.
    The credibility of the polling point may be valid, it may not, but if someone has sympathy for Isis I dont see why they deserve the distinction, if they have one, from supporting the full aims of Isis. Some organisations and ideologies are so vile you cannot be a little bit sympathetic to them as if you can ignore the vileness. We would not forgive someone with nazi sympathies because they don't support everything the nazis stood for.

    Good night all.

    Yes, I went Godwin on this. But people cannot divorce the reality of is from some some abstract sympathy with various grievances or vague statements, and we should not allow people to pretend that either.
    The Godwin reference is appropriate - IS is indeed vile, inhuman and indefensible.
  • Tim_BTim_B Posts: 7,057
    An interesting 'breaking news' item just flashed up on CNN.

    Lawyer - Abdeslam "really upset" during ride from Paris.

    Something must be going on.
  • RobDRobD Posts: 31,828
    Tim_B said:

    An interesting 'breaking news' item just flashed up on CNN.

    Lawyer - Abdeslam "really upset" during ride from Paris.

    Something must be going on.

    How would his lawyer know that?
  • RobD said:

    Tim_B said:

    An interesting 'breaking news' item just flashed up on CNN.

    Lawyer - Abdeslam "really upset" during ride from Paris.

    Something must be going on.

    How would his lawyer know that?
    from the guys that were in the car with him, apparently
  • RobDRobD Posts: 31,828

    RobD said:

    Tim_B said:

    An interesting 'breaking news' item just flashed up on CNN.

    Lawyer - Abdeslam "really upset" during ride from Paris.

    Something must be going on.

    How would his lawyer know that?
    from the guys that were in the car with him, apparently
    Ah right. I notice he slipped through the net again.
  • TomTom Posts: 272
    The polling question doesn't ask whether they have sympathy for Isis but whether they have sympathy for 'young Muslims in the uk who leave to join fighters in Syria'. Still not a happy finding but it is possible to have some sympathy with someone who's gone to fight against Assad while thinking they are wrong. I can't imagine the pollster is happy with the headline if the question doesn't mention Isis. You could equally answer yes to that question if you have sympathy for someone who has gone to fight for the FSA or peshmerga.
  • Tim_BTim_B Posts: 7,057
    RobD said:

    Tim_B said:

    An interesting 'breaking news' item just flashed up on CNN.

    Lawyer - Abdeslam "really upset" during ride from Paris.

    Something must be going on.

    How would his lawyer know that?
    Man, you are so smart :)
  • Y0kelY0kel Posts: 2,124
    edited November 2015
    Tim_B said:

    An interesting 'breaking news' item just flashed up on CNN.

    Lawyer - Abdeslam "really upset" during ride from Paris.

    Something must be going on.

    The Belgian authorities believe they are closing in, but they are currently involved in a mix of transmitting genuine info, and pure disinformation.
  • RobDRobD Posts: 31,828
    Tim_B said:

    RobD said:

    Tim_B said:

    An interesting 'breaking news' item just flashed up on CNN.

    Lawyer - Abdeslam "really upset" during ride from Paris.

    Something must be going on.

    How would his lawyer know that?
    Man, you are so smart :)
    I do try ;)
  • HYUFDHYUFD Posts: 39,645
    edited November 2015
    The centre-right candidate Mauricio Macri leads on 54% to the 46% of Kirchner's preferred candidate, Daniel Scioli, with about half of votes counted in the final round of the Argentine presidential election
    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-latin-america-34896847
  • Tim_BTim_B Posts: 7,057
    I was watching the NASCAR race in Homestead and lost the will to live for a while.

    CNN has a piece on Davide Martello, the pianist who cycles round Paris with a grand piano behind his bicycle. He pedals up, then plays John Lennon's Imagine and everybody cries. Quite amazing.
  • Tim_BTim_B Posts: 7,057
    edited November 2015
    RobD said:

    Tim_B said:

    RobD said:

    Tim_B said:

    An interesting 'breaking news' item just flashed up on CNN.

    Lawyer - Abdeslam "really upset" during ride from Paris.

    Something must be going on.

    How would his lawyer know that?
    Man, you are so smart :)
    I do try ;)
    When you finally leave the UK for the USA the average IQ of both countries will decline :open_mouth:
  • Tim_BTim_B Posts: 7,057
    HYUFD said:

    The centre-right candidate Mauricio Macri leads on 54% to the 46% of Kirchner's preferred candidate, Daniel Scioli, with about half of votes counted in the final round of the Argentine presidential election
    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-latin-america-34896847

    The Kirchner woman is horrid, so it looks like good news
  • TomTom Posts: 272
    HYUFD said:

    The centre-right candidate Mauricio Macri leads on 54% to the 46% of Kirchner's preferred candidate, Daniel Scioli, with about half of votes counted in the final round of the Argentine presidential election
    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-latin-america-34896847

    If he can govern as a relatively centrist honest non-Peronist it would be a blessing for Argentina. Wonderful country but terribly governed. Spanish caudillismo and Italian populist corruption. Dismal.
  • Y0kel said:

    Tim_B said:

    An interesting 'breaking news' item just flashed up on CNN.

    Lawyer - Abdeslam "really upset" during ride from Paris.

    Something must be going on.

    The Belgian authorities believe they are closing in, but they are currently involved in a mix of transmitting genuine info, and pure disinformation.
    Both of which are being drowned out by tens of thousands of people posting pictures of their cats. We love you, the internet.
  • HYUFDHYUFD Posts: 39,645
    edited November 2015
    Tim_B said:

    HYUFD said:

    The centre-right candidate Mauricio Macri leads on 54% to the 46% of Kirchner's preferred candidate, Daniel Scioli, with about half of votes counted in the final round of the Argentine presidential election
    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-latin-america-34896847

    The Kirchner woman is horrid, so it looks like good news
    Yes also good news for the Falklands as he wants a more amicable relationship with the UK
  • Tim_BTim_B Posts: 7,057
    So we now know that 2 of the Paris attackers landed on the Greek island of Leros and found their way to Paris without being detected.

    To any sane person, that should spell the end of Schengen.

    But watching Dateline London this morning, (why is Polly Toynbee or some other Grauniad reporter always on it?), three correspondents were discussing the Schengen problem rationally, but the French reporter (usually lucid, fact based and rational) was levitating with anger, almost as if someone were inserting half a raw onion in his rectum, and saying that Schengen's abolition was unthinkable. When asked why, all he could come up with is that "It's part of the European ideal."

    That's not even an argument, just an almost blind religious commitment and fervor to the EU 'ideal'. I'd like to stuff an entire raw onion up his rectum. Maybe a couple.

    It's nonsense like this that makes me dislike the EU.
  • HYUFDHYUFD Posts: 39,645
    Tom said:

    HYUFD said:

    The centre-right candidate Mauricio Macri leads on 54% to the 46% of Kirchner's preferred candidate, Daniel Scioli, with about half of votes counted in the final round of the Argentine presidential election
    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-latin-america-34896847

    If he can govern as a relatively centrist honest non-Peronist it would be a blessing for Argentina. Wonderful country but terribly governed. Spanish caudillismo and Italian populist corruption. Dismal.
    Indeed, he has been Mayor of Buenos Aires and a successful businessman so fingers crossed, night
  • Tim_BTim_B Posts: 7,057
    HYUFD said:

    Tim_B said:

    HYUFD said:

    The centre-right candidate Mauricio Macri leads on 54% to the 46% of Kirchner's preferred candidate, Daniel Scioli, with about half of votes counted in the final round of the Argentine presidential election
    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-latin-america-34896847

    The Kirchner woman is horrid, so it looks like good news
    Yes also good news for the Falklands as he wants a more amicable relationship with the UK
    Translation - he's not going to get any economic aid or business from the UK if Las Malvinas remains an issue.
  • AndyJSAndyJS Posts: 21,371
    "Molenbeek broke my heart

    A former resident reflects on his struggles with Brussels’ most notorious neighborhood.
    By Teun Voeten"


    http://www.politico.eu/article/molenbeek-broke-my-heart-radicalization-suburb-brussels-gentrification/
  • HYUFDHYUFD Posts: 39,645
    Tim_B said:

    HYUFD said:

    Tim_B said:

    HYUFD said:

    The centre-right candidate Mauricio Macri leads on 54% to the 46% of Kirchner's preferred candidate, Daniel Scioli, with about half of votes counted in the final round of the Argentine presidential election
    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-latin-america-34896847

    The Kirchner woman is horrid, so it looks like good news
    Yes also good news for the Falklands as he wants a more amicable relationship with the UK
    Translation - he's not going to get any economic aid or business from the UK if Las Malvinas remains an issue.
    That may well be part of it too, night
  • AndyJSAndyJS Posts: 21,371
    The French regard the EU as their last chance to build an empire capable of rivalling the United States. That's why they don't want to give up on Schengen no matter what happens.
    Tim_B said:

    So we now know that 2 of the Paris attackers landed on the Greek island of Leros and found their way to Paris without being detected.

    To any sane person, that should spell the end of Schengen.

    But watching Dateline London this morning, (why is Polly Toynbee or some other Grauniad reporter always on it?), three correspondents were discussing the Schengen problem rationally, but the French reporter (usually lucid, fact based and rational) was levitating with anger, almost as if someone were inserting half a raw onion in his rectum, and saying that Schengen's abolition was unthinkable. When asked why, all he could come up with is that "It's part of the European ideal."

    That's not even an argument, just an almost blind religious commitment and fervor to the EU 'ideal'. I'd like to stuff an entire raw onion up his rectum. Maybe a couple.

    It's nonsense like this that makes me dislike the EU.

  • Tim_BTim_B Posts: 7,057
    edited November 2015
    French and onions. It just works ;)

    How does showing your passport at the border diminish Europe?
    AndyJS said:

    The French regard the EU as their last chance to build an empire capable of rivalling the United States. That's why they don't want to give up on Schengen no matter what happens.

    Tim_B said:

    So we now know that 2 of the Paris attackers landed on the Greek island of Leros and found their way to Paris without being detected.

    To any sane person, that should spell the end of Schengen.

    But watching Dateline London this morning, (why is Polly Toynbee or some other Grauniad reporter always on it?), three correspondents were discussing the Schengen problem rationally, but the French reporter (usually lucid, fact based and rational) was levitating with anger, almost as if someone were inserting half a raw onion in his rectum, and saying that Schengen's abolition was unthinkable. When asked why, all he could come up with is that "It's part of the European ideal."

    That's not even an argument, just an almost blind religious commitment and fervor to the EU 'ideal'. I'd like to stuff an entire raw onion up his rectum. Maybe a couple.

    It's nonsense like this that makes me dislike the EU.

  • Tim_B said:

    HYUFD said:

    Tim_B said:

    HYUFD said:

    The centre-right candidate Mauricio Macri leads on 54% to the 46% of Kirchner's preferred candidate, Daniel Scioli, with about half of votes counted in the final round of the Argentine presidential election
    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-latin-america-34896847

    The Kirchner woman is horrid, so it looks like good news
    Yes also good news for the Falklands as he wants a more amicable relationship with the UK
    Translation - he's not going to get any economic aid or business from the UK if Las Malvinas remains an issue.
    "Las Malvinas" derives from the French "Les Malouines", referring to "from St. Malo".
  • Tim_BTim_B Posts: 7,057

    Tim_B said:

    HYUFD said:

    Tim_B said:

    HYUFD said:

    The centre-right candidate Mauricio Macri leads on 54% to the 46% of Kirchner's preferred candidate, Daniel Scioli, with about half of votes counted in the final round of the Argentine presidential election
    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-latin-america-34896847

    The Kirchner woman is horrid, so it looks like good news
    Yes also good news for the Falklands as he wants a more amicable relationship with the UK
    Translation - he's not going to get any economic aid or business from the UK if Las Malvinas remains an issue.
    "Las Malvinas" derives from the French "Les Malouines", referring to "from St. Malo".
    St Malo is a sub-division on McGinnis Ferry Rd in Duluth, GA. I hear rumors of another named after it in France ;)
  • Tim_B said:

    Tim_B said:

    HYUFD said:

    Tim_B said:

    HYUFD said:

    The centre-right candidate Mauricio Macri leads on 54% to the 46% of Kirchner's preferred candidate, Daniel Scioli, with about half of votes counted in the final round of the Argentine presidential election
    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-latin-america-34896847

    The Kirchner woman is horrid, so it looks like good news
    Yes also good news for the Falklands as he wants a more amicable relationship with the UK
    Translation - he's not going to get any economic aid or business from the UK if Las Malvinas remains an issue.
    "Las Malvinas" derives from the French "Les Malouines", referring to "from St. Malo".
    St Malo is a sub-division on McGinnis Ferry Rd in Duluth, GA. I hear rumors of another named after it in France ;)
    Oh, I expect it be the St Malo in Britanny :)
  • http://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2015/nov/22/marco-rubio-isis-strategy-us-troops-exclusive-interview

    "The only way to defeat Isis is for Sunni Arabs themselves to reject them ideologically and defeat them militarily,” Rubio said. “They must be defeated on the ground with a ground force that is made up primarily of Arab Sunni fighters from Iraq, from Syria, but also from Jordan, from Egypt, from the Emirates, from Saudi Arabia.”

    Is Rubio's plan a sectarian regional war with the US on one side and Russia on the other?
  • MTimTMTimT Posts: 6,648
    glw said:

    Chris_A said:

    I'm astounded the US government spends more public money on health than we do.

    The USA has no national healthcare system, but multiple systems that cover some of the most expensive parts of the population. Medicare (the elderly), Medicaid (low incomes), the VHA (military veterans), the MHS (serving military), between them they spend a fortune, and there are probably some other big programmes I've forgotten. It is a barmy system of healthcare.
    Exactly. You can't both claim the US is a barmy system (which it is) and also hold it up as a reason why the NHS needs to spend more.
This discussion has been closed.