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politicalbetting.com » Blog Archive » The Brexit scare mongering Tweet of the day

SystemSystem Posts: 3,967
edited October 11 in General

imagepoliticalbetting.com » Blog Archive » The Brexit scare mongering Tweet of the day

Britain 2024 pic.twitter.com/8qsdZ95ewI

Read the full story here


Comments

  • JonathanJonathan Posts: 6,992
    edited October 11
    Where's the scaremongering tweet? Plenty of British rats for everyone.
  • kle4kle4 Posts: 26,101
    Jonathan said:

    Where's the scaremongering tweet? Plenty of British rats for everyone.

    Probably less environmentally taxing than cow farming, too. Sustainable.
  • TomsToms Posts: 1,369
    Guys,
    and don't forget the bugs. Like rats, they're globalists.
  • FrancisUrquhartFrancisUrquhart Posts: 24,002
    What a new thread....We were just about to have a good argument over pineapple on pizzas ....
  • Ishmael_ZIshmael_Z Posts: 3,445
    Plagiarised from the infinitely funnier original (hat tip TUD)
  • PongPong Posts: 4,274
    I hate that film
  • kle4kle4 Posts: 26,101
    I have never felt any inclination to watch or read The Road - I've not really understood the point of, as I understand it, watching people slowly die over 2 hours.
  • MarkHopkinsMarkHopkins Posts: 4,896
    Scott_P said:

    I give up. Aren't cartoons supposed to be funny?

  • kle4kle4 Posts: 26,101
    Scott_P said:
    The public had opportunity to vote for anti-Brexit parties, and didn't do so, instead supporting leave supporting labour and leave supporting Tories, cannot blame the rest for trying to give the public what they wanted, even if they are doing a poor job of it.
  • kle4kle4 Posts: 26,101

    Scott_P said:

    I give up. Aren't cartoons supposed to be funny?

    A great many are not - I think this one suffers from 'too much text' syndrome, given the campaign bus over the edge of the cliffs of dover would be be a perfectly adequate message with far less text. I don't even get why 'Let's take more acid' is there.
  • Ishmael_ZIshmael_Z Posts: 3,445
    kle4 said:

    I have never felt any inclination to watch or read The Road - I've not really understood the point of, as I understand it, watching people slowly die over 2 hours.

    You don't understand it, then. I assume you haven't seen Hamlet either, which is just 3 hours of some entitled young Danish toff wibbling about should he top himself, or Lear - elderly dementia sufferer regrets IHT avoidance scheme. And so on.

    The chapter about the people under the trapdoor in particular is a masterpiece; it is the most horrific piece of horror you will ever read, but all done by implication so cleverly that you could read it to a class of 5 year olds without upsetting them.
  • Ishmael_ZIshmael_Z Posts: 3,445
    kle4 said:

    Scott_P said:

    I give up. Aren't cartoons supposed to be funny?

    A great many are not - I think this one suffers from 'too much text' syndrome, given the campaign bus over the edge of the cliffs of dover would be be a perfectly adequate message with far less text. I don't even get why 'Let's take more acid' is there.
    Ken Kesey reference? Not that that makes it any better. My standard advice to political cartoonists is, be Matt or go home.
  • kle4kle4 Posts: 26,101
    edited October 11
    Ishmael_Z said:

    kle4 said:

    I have never felt any inclination to watch or read The Road - I've not really understood the point of, as I understand it, watching people slowly die over 2 hours.

    You don't understand it, then. I assume you haven't seen Hamlet either, which is just 3 hours of some entitled young Danish toff wibbling about should he top himself, or Lear - elderly dementia sufferer regrets IHT avoidance scheme. And so on.

    The chapter about the people under the trapdoor in particular is a masterpiece; it is the most horrific piece of horror you will ever read, but all done by implication so cleverly that you could read it to a class of 5 year olds without upsetting them.
    I don't understand it because it's done a poor job conveying to me it is about more than watching depressing garbage, and therefore worth my time. Hamlet doesn't suffer from such a problem in the slightest, nor do most stories. I don't doubt The Road has quality, it wouldn't be such a successful book that got turned into a movie if it wasn't, but I need a reason to see something - no one can be expected to assume something is great before they experience it, not Shakespeare, not Stanley Kubrick, nothing, they have to convince us to give it a chance first. The Road obviously convinced plenty of people, but so far I'm not sold on why I should give it a chance - not least because it is one of those books people get very snooty about having read because it is apparently such a masterpiece, which makes me wary of the movie.
  • FrancisUrquhartFrancisUrquhart Posts: 24,002
    British ISIS recruiter Sally Jones is 'killed in US drone strike in Syria'

    Well thats unfortunate...
  • welshowlwelshowl Posts: 2,913

    British ISIS recruiter Sally Jones is 'killed in US drone strike in Syria'

    Well thats unfortunate...

    If true, really tragic. I will be inconsolable.
  • bigjohnowlsbigjohnowls Posts: 8,722
    When I were a lad wud ave killed for a rat we got half a cockroach a day


    If we were lucky.



    Remoaners dont know their born
  • viewcodeviewcode Posts: 4,294

    When I were a lad wud ave killed for a rat we got half a cockroach a day


    If we were lucky.



    Remoaners dont know their born

    "they're"

    :)
  • Ishmael_ZIshmael_Z Posts: 3,445
    kle4 said:

    Ishmael_Z said:

    kle4 said:

    I have never felt any inclination to watch or read The Road - I've not really understood the point of, as I understand it, watching people slowly die over 2 hours.

    You don't understand it, then. I assume you haven't seen Hamlet either, which is just 3 hours of some entitled young Danish toff wibbling about should he top himself, or Lear - elderly dementia sufferer regrets IHT avoidance scheme. And so on.

    The chapter about the people under the trapdoor in particular is a masterpiece; it is the most horrific piece of horror you will ever read, but all done by implication so cleverly that you could read it to a class of 5 year olds without upsetting them.
    I don't understand it because it's done a poor job conveying to me it is about more than watching depressing garbage, and therefore worth my time. Hamlet doesn't suffer from such a problem in the slightest, nor do most stories. I don't doubt The Road has quality, it wouldn't be such a successful book that got turned into a movie if it wasn't, but I need a reason to see something - no one can be expected to assume something is great before they experience it, not Shakespeare, not Stanley Kubrick, nothing, they have to convince us to give it a chance first. The Road obviously convinced plenty of people, but so far I'm not sold on why I should give it a chance - not least because it is one of those books people get very snooty about having read because it is apparently such a masterpiece, which makes me wary of the movie.
    I was thinking on similar lines about Blade runner "flopping" on the weekend it opened - that surely is a judgment about how good the expectations the film created were, not of its intrinsic value.

    The Road is worth both reading, and seeing.
  • bigjohnowlsbigjohnowls Posts: 8,722
    viewcode said:

    When I were a lad wud ave killed for a rat we got half a cockroach a day


    If we were lucky.



    Remoaners dont know their born

    "they're"

    :)
    Not when we were lads shortage of y's and 's



    could only use one y and half a ' per decade!!!
  • OchEyeOchEye Posts: 633

    viewcode said:

    When I were a lad wud ave killed for a rat we got half a cockroach a day


    If we were lucky.



    Remoaners dont know their born

    "they're"

    :)
    Not when we were lads shortage of y's and 's



    could only use one y and half a ' per decade!!!
    Eeeee! You were lucky, back when......
  • bigjohnowlsbigjohnowls Posts: 8,722
    OchEye said:

    viewcode said:

    When I were a lad wud ave killed for a rat we got half a cockroach a day


    If we were lucky.



    Remoaners dont know their born

    "they're"

    :)
    Not when we were lads shortage of y's and 's



    could only use one y and half a ' per decade!!!
    Eeeee! You were lucky, back when......
    Not really that alf a cockroach ad to feed 10 of us
  • bigjohnowlsbigjohnowls Posts: 8,722
    Goodny't
  • kle4kle4 Posts: 26,101
    Ishmael_Z said:

    kle4 said:

    Ishmael_Z said:

    kle4 said:

    I have never felt any inclination to watch or read The Road - I've not really understood the point of, as I understand it, watching people slowly die over 2 hours.

    You don't understand it, then. I assume you haven't seen Hamlet either, which is just 3 hours of some entitled young Danish toff wibbling about should he top himself, or Lear - elderly dementia sufferer regrets IHT avoidance scheme. And so on.

    The chapter about the people under the trapdoor in particular is a masterpiece; it is the most horrific piece of horror you will ever read, but all done by implication so cleverly that you could read it to a class of 5 year olds without upsetting them.
    I don't understand it because it's done a poor job conveying to me it is about more than watching depressing garbage, and therefore worth my time. Hamlet doesn't suffer from such a problem in the slightest, nor do most stories. I don't doubt The Road has quality, it wouldn't be such a successful book that got turned into a movie if it wasn't, but I need a reason to see something - no one can be expected to assume something is great before they experience it, not Shakespeare, not Stanley Kubrick, nothing, they have to convince us to give it a chance first. The Road obviously convinced plenty of people, but so far I'm not sold on why I should give it a chance - not least because it is one of those books people get very snooty about having read because it is apparently such a masterpiece, which makes me wary of the movie.
    I was thinking on similar lines about Blade runner "flopping" on the weekend it opened - that surely is a judgment about how good the expectations the film created were, not of its intrinsic value.

    The Road is worth both reading, and seeing.
    I'll get to it one day I guess. Before Brexit Britain turns it into a reality at any rate.
  • dixiedeandixiedean Posts: 1,420
    edited October 11
    Ishmael_Z said:

    kle4 said:

    Scott_P said:

    I give up. Aren't cartoons supposed to be funny?

    A great many are not - I think this one suffers from 'too much text' syndrome, given the campaign bus over the edge of the cliffs of dover would be be a perfectly adequate message with far less text. I don't even get why 'Let's take more acid' is there.
    Ken Kesey reference? Not that that makes it any better. My standard advice to political cartoonists is, be Matt or go home.
    Yes, but Matt, good as he is, is a gag teller. He brings together 2 seemingly unrelated topics to make a usually funny juxtaposition.
    However, he can't draw particularly well (though better than me), nor does he use caricature to give a wider impression of the subject.
    He is the Bob Monkhouse of cartooning.
  • Sunil_PrasannanSunil_Prasannan Posts: 25,052
    edited October 11

    Brexitter
    -------------

    New words by Sunil, original "Bedsitter" music by Almond & Ball.

    Friday morning going slow
    I'm watching the election show
    Lots of Ladbrokes slips on the floor
    Memories of the night before
    Out knocking up and having fun
    Now I've stopped reading The Sun
    Waiting for the results to show
    But why I voted no one knows

    Voting, polling
    Blogging, trolling
    And now I'm all alone
    In Brexit Land
    My only home

    I think it's time to write a thread
    To vent the bemusement in my head
    Spent my money on online bookies
    Got nowt here but all the cookies
    Clean my suit and my rosette
    Election promises to forget
    Start campaigning all over again
    Kid myself I'm having fun

    Voting, polling
    Blogging, trolling
    And now I'm all alone
    In Brexit Land
    My only home

    Looking out from my worldview
    I've really nothing else to do
    Seems like I have started fretting
    Let's read Political Betting
    Forget The Mirror and The Times
    The battle bus with such great lines
    Look around and I can see
    A thousand punters just like me

    Voting, polling
    Blogging, trolling
    And now I'm all alone
    In Brexit Land
    My only home

    Voting, polling
    Blogging, trolling
    And now I'm all alone
    In Brexit Land
    My only home

    (I'm waiting for Brexit
    Or am I wasting time)


  • MarqueeMarkMarqueeMark Posts: 14,304
    welshowl said:

    British ISIS recruiter Sally Jones is 'killed in US drone strike in Syria'

    Well thats unfortunate...

    If true, really tragic. I will be inconsolable.
    Now now, don't be so flippant about Mr. Corbyn's grief...
  • viewcodeviewcode Posts: 4,294

    viewcode said:

    When I were a lad wud ave killed for a rat we got half a cockroach a day


    If we were lucky.



    Remoaners dont know their born

    "they're"

    :)
    Not when we were lads shortage of y's and 's



    could only use one y and half a ' per decade!!!
    :) :)
  • Sorry for commenting on the previous thread header, but I've been out all day.

    The premise that "It’s possible that LAB could’ve fared better with a unequivocal Remainer as head" is frankly pure wishful thinking and does not follow from Rob Ford's analysis.

    Having been the local Constituency Labour Party Secretary at the last GE, I can tell you that the entire GE strategy followed in Labour literature here and elsewhere was to simply play down the salience of Brexit along the following lines: Brexit was basically going to happen in one form or another; the only question was the terms on which it happened; no explicit talk about single markets etc; plenty about a "reckless" Tory approach threatening jobs, working conditions, the environment etc; even an 11th hour change of tack on immigration sought to defuse that issue. In no election leaflet or mailshot that I signed off was Brexit anything other than a relative footnote.

    There was an expectation that Labour might nonetheless pick up some votes of disgruntled Remainers on the back of its actions in 2016. That did indeed happen, especially where it mattered in tactical voting terms. The bigger worry was the need to retain those "Leave" voters who naturally looked to Labour but who were at risk of deserting in response to the party's previously unequivocal Remain stance. That by and large did not happen, at least not to anything like the extent feared, and the reason it did not is because of the stance above. There's every reason to think that large scale desertion of Leave voters was a bullet that Labour dodged, such was the scale of working class votes for Brexit in 2016. There's nothing in Rob Ford's analysis to suggest that the bullet would not have hit home if Labour had copied the Lib Dems failed tactics in GE 2017.

    But there's a further point. Labour achieved a net swing because by playing down Brexit, the party was then able to focus on problems that people cared about and directly affected their day to day lives, Corbyn eventually being rightly seen as being far more in touch with peoples' concerns than May as a consequence. Had Labour instead also followed the Tories and Lib Dems by making the GE a re-run of Brexit, which is what an unequivocal pro-Remain approach would have done, the GE would have been fought on ground of the Tories' choosing.
  • Scott_P said:
    If you are a left wing Eurosceptic, who has all their life baulked at buying a right wing rag on principle, and can no longer stand the Guardian relentlessly ramming Remain c**p down your throat, is there any choice now but to buy the Morning Star to get an occasional alternative perspective on the EU?
  • dixiedeandixiedean Posts: 1,420

    Sorry for commenting on the previous thread header, but I've been out all day.

    The premise that "It’s possible that LAB could’ve fared better with a unequivocal Remainer as head" is frankly pure wishful thinking and does not follow from Rob Ford's analysis.

    Having been the local Constituency Labour Party Secretary at the last GE, I can tell you that the entire GE strategy followed in Labour literature here and elsewhere was to simply play down the salience of Brexit along the following lines: Brexit was basically going to happen in one form or another; the only question was the terms on which it happened; no explicit talk about single markets etc; plenty about a "reckless" Tory approach threatening jobs, working conditions, the environment etc; even an 11th hour change of tack on immigration sought to defuse that issue. In no election leaflet or mailshot that I signed off was Brexit anything other than a relative footnote.

    There was an expectation that Labour might nonetheless pick up some votes of disgruntled Remainers on the back of its actions in 2016. That did indeed happen, especially where it mattered in tactical voting terms. The bigger worry was the need to retain those "Leave" voters who naturally looked to Labour but who were at risk of deserting in response to the party's previously unequivocal Remain stance. That by and large did not happen, at least not to anything like the extent feared, and the reason it did not is because of the stance above. There's every reason to think that large scale desertion of Leave voters was a bullet that Labour dodged, such was the scale of working class votes for Brexit in 2016. There's nothing in Rob Ford's analysis to suggest that the bullet would not have hit home if Labour had copied the Lib Dems failed tactics in GE 2017.

    But there's a further point. Labour achieved a net swing because by playing down Brexit, the party was then able to focus on problems that people cared about and directly affected their day to day lives, Corbyn eventually being rightly seen as being far more in touch with peoples' concerns than May as a consequence. Had Labour instead also followed the Tories and Lib Dems by making the GE a re-run of Brexit, which is what an unequivocal pro-Remain approach would have done, the GE would have been fought on ground of the Tories' choosing.

    +!
    Tallies with my experiences.
    The idea that Make a success of Brexit/Make a disaster of Brexit will lead to the decline of Corbynism is so much wishful thinking on the part of his opponents.
    Whether Brexit is/is not the most important issue cited is irrelevant.
    The other issues raised by Labour don't go away, regardless of Brexit, or of who leads Labour or the Conservatives.
  • hunchmanhunchman Posts: 2,328
    Have to laugh at that tweet. It seems that the more the scare stories are shown to be untrue, the more outrageous the new scare stories become. Although, yes I do think there are food shortages, which won't be thanks to Brexit, but the oncoming Grand Solar Minimum, which funnily enough should bottom around 2024. I guess that won't stop some Remoaner's from blaming it on Brexit instead of the Eddy minimum that most serious solar physicists are naming the oncoming cold spell.

    As for the Remoaner's predicted disaster of exiting the EU with no deal and trading on WTO rules, there are many successful economies that trade under WTO rules. Look back at the high growth rates of the 1960's when trade tariffs were much higher than the current WTO rules. And on the government's own economic figures, economic growth peaked in 1973, and has been successively lower at the peaks of the business cycles since then. I really do wonder whether the Remoaner's are Martians in disguise. You do seriously wonder what planet they come from, its just so easy for them to be hoodwinked.
  • kle4kle4 Posts: 26,101
    edited October 11
    So judging from media reports May is basically in open warfare with her Foreign Minister and her Chancellor. Let's hope Rudd is not on maneuvers too, otherwise not a single Great Office of State is held by someone who isn't focused on undermining the Prime Minister.

    (Yes, I'm including May herself, with her tempting fate words on Brexit, seemingly designed to rile up the hardcore Brexiters)
  • dixiedeandixiedean Posts: 1,420

    Scott_P said:
    If you are a left wing Eurosceptic, who has all their life baulked at buying a right wing rag on principle, and can no longer stand the Guardian relentlessly ramming Remain c**p down your throat, is there any choice now but to buy the Morning Star to get an occasional alternative perspective on the EU?
    You could do what everyone else is doing. Ignore newspapers.
  • foxinsoxukfoxinsoxuk Posts: 22,416
    edited October 11
    On topic,

    I have seen mouse kebabs on sale in Malawi, rather like these ones:

    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-1205259/Making-meal-mice-Malawi.html

    Apparently the burnt fur adds to the flavour.

    Personally I drew the line at deep fried flying ants, which were reasonably pleasant, but not so enjoyable that I would seek them out.
  • hunchmanhunchman Posts: 2,328
    kle4 said:

    So judging from media reports May is basically in open warfare with her Foreign Minister and her Chancellor. Let's hope Rudd is not on maneuvers too, otherwise not a single Great Office of State is held by someone who isn't focused on undermining the Prime Minister.

    (Yes, I'm including May herself, with her tempting fate words on Brexit, seemingly designed to rile up the hardcore Brexiters)

    Well Treason May well and truly failed the LBC Iain Dale interview yesterday. Loved that line of questioning from Dale, a lovely skewer question if ever there was one!
  • hunchmanhunchman Posts: 2,328

    On topic,

    I have seen mouse kebabs on sale in Malawi, rather like these ones:

    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-1205259/Making-meal-mice-Malawi.html

    Apparently the burnt fur adds to the flavour.

    Personally I drew the line at deep fried flying ants, which were reasonably pleasant, but not so enjoyable that I would seek them out.

    Silk worms on sticks in Beijing were good!
  • foxinsoxukfoxinsoxuk Posts: 22,416
    kle4 said:

    So judging from media reports May is basically in open warfare with her Foreign Minister and her Chancellor. Let's hope Rudd is not on maneuvers too, otherwise not a single Great Office of State is held by someone who isn't focused on undermining the Prime Minister.

    (Yes, I'm including May herself, with her tempting fate words on Brexit, seemingly designed to rile up the hardcore Brexiters)

    Surely a proper contest would do no more harm than the current infighting?
  • hunchmanhunchman Posts: 2,328
    kle4 said:

    So judging from media reports May is basically in open warfare with her Foreign Minister and her Chancellor. Let's hope Rudd is not on maneuvers too, otherwise not a single Great Office of State is held by someone who isn't focused on undermining the Prime Minister.

    (Yes, I'm including May herself, with her tempting fate words on Brexit, seemingly designed to rile up the hardcore Brexiters)

    They'd never risk Rudd as PM thanks to her past business career. Its just too toxic believe me. Plus the small matter of her 346 majority. Nicholas Wilson, the HSBC whistleblower, may not have won that many votes in Hastings and Rye, but that YouTube clip of the hustings with Rudd in full panic mode was priceless.
  • kle4kle4 Posts: 26,101

    kle4 said:

    So judging from media reports May is basically in open warfare with her Foreign Minister and her Chancellor. Let's hope Rudd is not on maneuvers too, otherwise not a single Great Office of State is held by someone who isn't focused on undermining the Prime Minister.

    (Yes, I'm including May herself, with her tempting fate words on Brexit, seemingly designed to rile up the hardcore Brexiters)

    Surely a proper contest would do no more harm than the current infighting?
    Not necessarily, if a winner emerges from the infighting before it becomes outfighting, as it were.
  • MortimerMortimer Posts: 8,096

    Scott_P said:

    I give up. Aren't cartoons supposed to be funny?

    Bell just isn't funny.

    Comes from working for the earnest paper, I spose.
  • dixiedeandixiedean Posts: 1,420
    edited October 11
    hunchman said:

    kle4 said:

    So judging from media reports May is basically in open warfare with her Foreign Minister and her Chancellor. Let's hope Rudd is not on maneuvers too, otherwise not a single Great Office of State is held by someone who isn't focused on undermining the Prime Minister.

    (Yes, I'm including May herself, with her tempting fate words on Brexit, seemingly designed to rile up the hardcore Brexiters)

    They'd never risk Rudd as PM thanks to her past business career. Its just too toxic believe me. Plus the small matter of her 346 majority. Nicholas Wilson, the HSBC whistleblower, may not have won that many votes in Hastings and Rye, but that YouTube clip of the hustings with Rudd in full panic mode was priceless.
    Ironically, his vote saved her seat, 412 votes on a majority of 346.
  • SeanTSeanT Posts: 19,978
    Say what you like about Harvey Weinstein (he seems like an odious and predatory creep to me), but he must have f*cked, groped, stripped and enjoyed an incredible number of extremely hot naked women, statistically. He was hitting, consistently, on aspiring Hollywood actresses and models, with a few really sexy 20-something female directors.

    Essentially, he preyed on the best of the best.

    And given what an ugly bastard he is, it is arguable his strategy "paid off". I cannot think of a similar rate and quality of success, not even for predatory sexual dictators like Saddam or Mussolini. Or Dominique Strauss Kahn.
  • NickPalmerNickPalmer Posts: 9,357

    Scott_P said:
    If you are a left wing Eurosceptic, who has all their life baulked at buying a right wing rag on principle, and can no longer stand the Guardian relentlessly ramming Remain c**p down your throat, is there any choice now but to buy the Morning Star to get an occasional alternative perspective on the EU?
    There are worse things, actually. Their writing is very uneven and some pieces are amateurish, but they cover things that nobody else bothers with - details of industrial disputes, the background to disasters abroad, both sides to the Catalonian issue - and they host a variety of leftwing opinions, including some space for Remainers to argue with the Leaver editorials. They're relentlessly anti-Tory but the days when they were just a hardline tankie paper have gone.

    https://morningstaronline.co.uk/
  • dixiedeandixiedean Posts: 1,420
    edited October 11
    SeanT said:

    Say what you like about Harvey Weinstein (he seems like an odious and predatory creep to me), but he must have f*cked, groped, stripped and enjoyed an incredible number of extremely hot naked women, statistically. He was hitting, consistently, on aspiring Hollywood actresses and models, with a few really sexy 20-something female directors.

    Essentially, he preyed on the best of the best.

    And given what an ugly bastard he is, it is arguable his strategy "paid off". I cannot think of a similar rate and quality of success, not even for predatory sexual dictators like Saddam or Mussolini. Or Dominique Strauss Kahn.

    Chapeau! Aren't you a little bit jealous?
    One problem. Why did he restrict himself? 36 genders...seems a shame to limit oneself.

    Fucking Puritans...
  • PulpstarPulpstar Posts: 41,377

    Scott_P said:
    If you are a left wing Eurosceptic, who has all their life baulked at buying a right wing rag on principle, and can no longer stand the Guardian relentlessly ramming Remain c**p down your throat, is there any choice now but to buy the Morning Star to get an occasional alternative perspective on the EU?
    There are worse things, actually. Their writing is very uneven and some pieces are amateurish, but they cover things that nobody else bothers with - details of industrial disputes, the background to disasters abroad, both sides to the Catalonian issue - and they host a variety of leftwing opinions, including some space for Remainers to argue with the Leaver editorials. They're relentlessly anti-Tory but the days when they were just a hardline tankie paper have gone.

    https://morningstaronline.co.uk/
    Relentlessly up to date with fund prices too :)
  • FrancisUrquhartFrancisUrquhart Posts: 24,002
    edited October 11
    Trump's Justice Department moves on Harvey Weinstein and orders FBI to open probe over fears he will 'do a Polanski'

    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-4971192/FBI-Harvey-Weinstein-probe-ordered-Trump-Justice-Dept.html

    I won't be surprised if we start to hear chants of "Lock him up" at Trump rallys.
  • rcs1000rcs1000 Posts: 19,791
    Thanks Sean :-)
  • Richard_TyndallRichard_Tyndall Posts: 12,844

    Scott_P said:
    If you are a left wing Eurosceptic, who has all their life baulked at buying a right wing rag on principle, and can no longer stand the Guardian relentlessly ramming Remain c**p down your throat, is there any choice now but to buy the Morning Star to get an occasional alternative perspective on the EU?
    Even as a right winger I still think the Guardian is probably the best newspaper out there, followed by the Times. At least they still concentrate on proper news and have some journalistic standards. Something, I am sorry to say, the Telegraph gave up on years ago.

    Once you understand the Guardian's slant on issues it is very easy to use it as an informed source of news by just ignoring the spin.
  • dixiedeandixiedean Posts: 1,420
    rcs1000 said:

    Thanks Sean :-)

    Qiuality intervention as ever. But ooh so allocishet gender normative.
  • AndyJSAndyJS Posts: 20,188
    "Pensioners with care needs must stop regarding their homes as “an asset to give to their offspring”, the social care minister has said, as she revived the row over the Conservatives’ so-called “dementia tax”.

    Jackie Doyle-Price said it was “unfair” for younger taxpayers to “prop up people to keep their property” when it could be sold to help pay for their own care needs."

    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2017/10/11/pensioners-told-homes-not-assets-pass-offspring-minister-revives/
  • rcs1000rcs1000 Posts: 19,791
    AndyJS said:

    "Pensioners with care needs must stop regarding their homes as “an asset to give to their offspring”, the social care minister has said, as she revived the row over the Conservatives’ so-called “dementia tax”.

    Jackie Doyle-Price said it was “unfair” for younger taxpayers to “prop up people to keep their property” when it could be sold to help pay for their own care needs."

    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2017/10/11/pensioners-told-homes-not-assets-pass-offspring-minister-revives/

    There are no good answers.

  • AndyJSAndyJS Posts: 20,188
    rcs1000 said:

    AndyJS said:

    "Pensioners with care needs must stop regarding their homes as “an asset to give to their offspring”, the social care minister has said, as she revived the row over the Conservatives’ so-called “dementia tax”.

    Jackie Doyle-Price said it was “unfair” for younger taxpayers to “prop up people to keep their property” when it could be sold to help pay for their own care needs."

    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2017/10/11/pensioners-told-homes-not-assets-pass-offspring-minister-revives/

    There are no good answers.

    That's true.
  • PongPong Posts: 4,274
    edited October 12
    AndyJS said:

    "Pensioners with care needs must stop regarding their homes as “an asset to give to their offspring”, the social care minister has said, as she revived the row over the Conservatives’ so-called “dementia tax”.

    Jackie Doyle-Price said it was “unfair” for younger taxpayers to “prop up people to keep their property” when it could be sold to help pay for their own care needs."

    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2017/10/11/pensioners-told-homes-not-assets-pass-offspring-minister-revives/

    This is the generational battle at the heart of modern conservatism.

    IMO, they have 2 options;

    1. Extend their client vote to capture even more working class pensioners/pre-pensioners.

    2. Liquidize a proportion of their client vote in order to reposition conservatism as an intergenerational ideology once more.

    Despite TM's steps to toward the centre in the manifesto/conference speech, I can't see how 2 happens, before the tories are kicked out. Any replacement leader will be forced to go with 1. The membership will not accept any replacement with even a sniff of the dementia tax about them.
  • foxinsoxukfoxinsoxuk Posts: 22,416
    edited October 12

    Trump's Justice Department moves on Harvey Weinstein and orders FBI to open probe over fears he will 'do a Polanski'

    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-4971192/FBI-Harvey-Weinstein-probe-ordered-Trump-Justice-Dept.html

    I won't be surprised if we start to hear chants of "Lock him up" at Trump rallys.

    Rather tricky!

    After all, who is the pussy grabber in chief to criticise anothers sexual assault!
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