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politicalbetting.com » Blog Archive » The money continues to go on Brexit NOT happening by March 29t

SystemSystem Posts: 5,841
edited February 20 in General

imagepoliticalbetting.com » Blog Archive » The money continues to go on Brexit NOT happening by March 29th next year – but the gap’s tightening

Twelve month chart from Betfata.io

Read the full story here


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Comments

  • Casino_RoyaleCasino_Royale Posts: 23,570
    Letter? What letter?
  • kle4kle4 Posts: 29,678
    Meanwhile March 29th 2019 gets even closer.

    It does?!
  • SeanTSeanT Posts: 20,386
    I have £1000 riding on this, with Mr WilliamGlenn. I find it difficult to believe any Tory leader would survive not Brexiting by that date. It will happen. Though what happens after is anyone's guess.

    Incidentally this story is interesting: secular trends that are shaping our politics. Young people are becoming more risk averse, with all that means. Because of insecurity.

    I can evidence this personally. I asked my 22 year old wife the other day how many of her post-uni friends had returned to live with their parents? She paused, then said "ALL of them".

    Not a single one of my friends, when I was 22, had returned to live with Mum and Dad. The idea was laughable.

    https://www.ft.com/content/66149ea8-158a-11e8-9e9c-25c814761640

    The party that addresses this will win the future.
  • kle4kle4 Posts: 29,678
    edited February 20

    tlg86 said:

    SeanT said:

    tlg86 said:

    Foxy said:

    tlg86 said:

    DavidL said:

    tlg86 said:

    Fourth place in the PL might not get Champions League football next season...

    England look set to get a lot of performance points this season with City and Liverpool already through.
    Sorry, I meant, finishing fourth this season is no guarantee of being in the Champions League next season.

    As I say that, Barca equalise.
    Contingent on Arsenal winning the Europa League? Doesn't that create a fifth place this year, in the unlikely event of it happening.
    Indeed it does, as happened with United last/this season.

    Only reason 4th doesn't get Champions League next season is that as always the 4th has to play a final pre-season qualifying game before the group stages. But that's always the case.

    England's 4th spot was at risk but with the dominance in the group stages (all 5 English clubs won their group) and already Liverpool and City at least almost certainly through if not more then that's no longer credibly at risk.
    No, the top four from the top four leagues go straight into the group stages from next season:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2018–19_UEFA_Champions_League
    That's a change. When was that agreed? At the start of the season there was a lot of talk about us potentially losing the 4th spot (as we could have dropped to 4th-ranked league). We're well ahead of 5th though.

    Already this season we've gained enough points to go from maybe-dropping-to-4th to now-upto-2nd. Having 5 clubs reach the last 16 has given us a massive points bonus.
    In the end the overwhelming financial muscle of the EPL was bound to have an effect. It may now be showing.
    At what point do the rest of the leagues come up with a tax on domestic television rights?
    That would screw Real Madrid and Barca.
    A plan with no drawbacks then.
  • This is going to be the Corn Laws Redux.

    To think I was criticised on Sunday for calling these leavers 'Hardline'
  • TGOHFTGOHF Posts: 17,457
    Nothing very controversial in that letter. Stick to the Florence speech Mrs May.
  • The most interesting thing about the letter is the paranoia of the ERG.

  • Casino_RoyaleCasino_Royale Posts: 23,570
    Thanks. There's one good friend of mine who's signed that letter, and another who agrees but hasn't because of payroll.
  • dixiedeandixiedean Posts: 2,028
    SeanT said:

    I have £1000 riding on this, with Mr WilliamGlenn. I find it difficult to believe any Tory leader would survive not Brexiting by that date. It will happen. Though what happens after is anyone's guess.

    Incidentally this story is interesting: secular trends that are shaping our politics. Young people are becoming more risk averse, with all that means. Because of insecurity.

    I can evidence this personally. I asked my 22 year old wife the other day how many of her post-uni friends had returned to live with their parents? She paused, then said "ALL of them".

    Not a single one of my friends, when I was 22, had returned to live with Mum and Dad. The idea was laughable.

    https://www.ft.com/content/66149ea8-158a-11e8-9e9c-25c814761640

    The party that addresses this will win the future.

    However, it has always confused me as to why we have the tradition of leaving home to go to University. Surely more staying at home and going to their local one would be beneficial all round. Many in other countries manage it. I know the idea was not credible in our day, but we didn't pay fees.
  • tlg86tlg86 Posts: 8,097
    FPT:

    tlg86 said:

    SeanT said:

    tlg86 said:

    Foxy said:

    tlg86 said:

    DavidL said:

    tlg86 said:

    Fourth place in the PL might not get Champions League football next season...

    England look set to get a lot of performance points this season with City and Liverpool already through.
    Sorry, I meant, finishing fourth this season is no guarantee of being in the Champions League next season.

    As I say that, Barca equalise.
    Contingent on Arsenal winning the Europa League? Doesn't that create a fifth place this year, in the unlikely event of it happening.
    Indeed it does, as happened with United last/this season.

    Only reason 4th doesn't get Champions League next season is that as always the 4th has to play a final pre-season qualifying game before the group stages. But that's always the case.

    England's 4th spot was at risk but with the dominance in the group stages (all 5 English clubs won their group) and already Liverpool and City at least almost certainly through if not more then that's no longer credibly at risk.
    No, the top four from the top four leagues go straight into the group stages from next season:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2018–19_UEFA_Champions_League
    That's a change. When was that agreed? At the start of the season there was a lot of talk about us potentially losing the 4th spot (as we could have dropped to 4th-ranked league). We're well ahead of 5th though.

    Already this season we've gained enough points to go from maybe-dropping-to-4th to now-upto-2nd. Having 5 clubs reach the last 16 has given us a massive points bonus.
    In the end the overwhelming financial muscle of the EPL was bound to have an effect. It may now be showing.
    At what point do the rest of the leagues come up with a tax on domestic television rights?
    That would screw Real Madrid and Barca.
    It would depend how the money was redistributed at the European level.
  • dixiedean said:

    SeanT said:

    I have £1000 riding on this, with Mr WilliamGlenn. I find it difficult to believe any Tory leader would survive not Brexiting by that date. It will happen. Though what happens after is anyone's guess.

    Incidentally this story is interesting: secular trends that are shaping our politics. Young people are becoming more risk averse, with all that means. Because of insecurity.

    I can evidence this personally. I asked my 22 year old wife the other day how many of her post-uni friends had returned to live with their parents? She paused, then said "ALL of them".

    Not a single one of my friends, when I was 22, had returned to live with Mum and Dad. The idea was laughable.

    https://www.ft.com/content/66149ea8-158a-11e8-9e9c-25c814761640

    The party that addresses this will win the future.

    However, it has always confused me as to why we have the tradition of leaving home to go to University. Surely more staying at home and going to their local one would be beneficial all round. Many in other countries manage it. I know the idea was not credible in our day, but we didn't pay fees.
    Universities aren't homogenous.

    Your nearest university might not excel in the discipline you're interested in whilst excelling at others.
  • TGOHFTGOHF Posts: 17,457
    Arf. This pig is being fattened well before polling day.


  • SeanTSeanT Posts: 20,386
    dixiedean said:

    SeanT said:

    I have £1000 riding on this, with Mr WilliamGlenn. I find it difficult to believe any Tory leader would survive not Brexiting by that date. It will happen. Though what happens after is anyone's guess.

    Incidentally this story is interesting: secular trends that are shaping our politics. Young people are becoming more risk averse, with all that means. Because of insecurity.

    I can evidence this personally. I asked my 22 year old wife the other day how many of her post-uni friends had returned to live with their parents? She paused, then said "ALL of them".

    Not a single one of my friends, when I was 22, had returned to live with Mum and Dad. The idea was laughable.

    https://www.ft.com/content/66149ea8-158a-11e8-9e9c-25c814761640

    The party that addresses this will win the future.

    However, it has always confused me as to why we have the tradition of leaving home to go to University. Surely more staying at home and going to their local one would be beneficial all round. Many in other countries manage it. I know the idea was not credible in our day, but we didn't pay fees.
    Disagree. One of the best aspects of the British - or English - tradition of higher education is the way it asked kids to be self reliant - to move out - from a relatively early age, 18. It certainly benefited me and made me more resourceful (or devious, if you want to be technical).
  • This is going to be the Corn Laws Redux.

    To think I was criticised on Sunday for calling these leavers 'Hardline'

    Have you read the same letter as me?

    The so-called "hard brexit" the ERG are after is a sort of mid-Brexit. It's certainly harder that the government currently wants, but not so far off that it cannot be fairly easily accommodated.

    The reason it can be accommodated is that it is evident that the principles at stake don't quite match up to the practice. So for example, they might want an end to regulatory oversight from Brussels: but are they really concerned with the European Medicines Agency? Or course not.
  • This is going to be the Corn Laws Redux.

    To think I was criticised on Sunday for calling these leavers 'Hardline'

    Have you read the same letter as me?

    The so-called "hard brexit" the ERG are after is a sort of mid-Brexit. It's certainly harder that the government currently wants, but not so far off that it cannot be fairly easily accommodated.

    The reason it can be accommodated is that it is evident that the principles at stake don't quite match up to the practice. So for example, they might want an end to regulatory oversight from Brussels: but are they really concerned with the European Medicines Agency? Or course not.
    I have, I agree with these interprertations



  • Danny565Danny565 Posts: 6,793
    TGOHF said:

    Arf. This pig is being fattened well before polling day.


    How many votes exactly do you think would be moved by people fearing Corbyn would regulate the press??
  • dixiedeandixiedean Posts: 2,028

    dixiedean said:

    SeanT said:

    I have £1000 riding on this, with Mr WilliamGlenn. I find it difficult to believe any Tory leader would survive not Brexiting by that date. It will happen. Though what happens after is anyone's guess.

    Incidentally this story is interesting: secular trends that are shaping our politics. Young people are becoming more risk averse, with all that means. Because of insecurity.

    I can evidence this personally. I asked my 22 year old wife the other day how many of her post-uni friends had returned to live with their parents? She paused, then said "ALL of them".

    Not a single one of my friends, when I was 22, had returned to live with Mum and Dad. The idea was laughable.

    https://www.ft.com/content/66149ea8-158a-11e8-9e9c-25c814761640

    The party that addresses this will win the future.

    However, it has always confused me as to why we have the tradition of leaving home to go to University. Surely more staying at home and going to their local one would be beneficial all round. Many in other countries manage it. I know the idea was not credible in our day, but we didn't pay fees.
    Universities aren't homogenous.

    Your nearest university might not excel in the discipline you're interested in whilst excelling at others.
    Of course I understand that. However, living at home and commuting ought to be the first consideration these days, if at all possible. I speak as the proud Dad of a son who got an interview at Durham today. Moreover, if you live in London or one of the other big conurbations there should be something available for most. There are 7 Universities within an hour by public transport of my childhood home. Not everyone gets on an excellent course at a top institution. In fact the vast majority don't.
  • dixiedean said:

    dixiedean said:

    SeanT said:

    I have £1000 riding on this, with Mr WilliamGlenn. I find it difficult to believe any Tory leader would survive not Brexiting by that date. It will happen. Though what happens after is anyone's guess.

    Incidentally this story is interesting: secular trends that are shaping our politics. Young people are becoming more risk averse, with all that means. Because of insecurity.

    I can evidence this personally. I asked my 22 year old wife the other day how many of her post-uni friends had returned to live with their parents? She paused, then said "ALL of them".

    Not a single one of my friends, when I was 22, had returned to live with Mum and Dad. The idea was laughable.

    https://www.ft.com/content/66149ea8-158a-11e8-9e9c-25c814761640

    The party that addresses this will win the future.

    However, it has always confused me as to why we have the tradition of leaving home to go to University. Surely more staying at home and going to their local one would be beneficial all round. Many in other countries manage it. I know the idea was not credible in our day, but we didn't pay fees.
    Universities aren't homogenous.

    Your nearest university might not excel in the discipline you're interested in whilst excelling at others.
    Of course I understand that. However, living at home and commuting ought to be the first consideration these days, if at all possible. I speak as the proud Dad of a son who got an interview at Durham today. Moreover, if you live in London or one of the other big conurbations there should be something available for most. There are 7 Universities within an hour by public transport of my childhood home. Not everyone gets on an excellent course at a top institution. In fact the vast majority don't.
    Congratulations.

    I had a break in Durham/Chester Le Street a few weeks ago, lovely part of the world.
  • TGOHF said:

    Arf. This pig is being fattened well before polling day.


    He has made a direct threat to the press and tonight the Sun has gone on full attack.

    Why did he not just laugh it off - he hasn't a clue
  • This is going to be the Corn Laws Redux.

    To think I was criticised on Sunday for calling these leavers 'Hardline'

    Have you read the same letter as me?

    The so-called "hard brexit" the ERG are after is a sort of mid-Brexit. It's certainly harder that the government currently wants, but not so far off that it cannot be fairly easily accommodated.

    The reason it can be accommodated is that it is evident that the principles at stake don't quite match up to the practice. So for example, they might want an end to regulatory oversight from Brussels: but are they really concerned with the European Medicines Agency? Or course not.
    I have, I agree with these interprertations




    Well, yes. It's more "leave" than the government is. But it's not a hardliner's manifesto. Remember JRM is calling for no transition (last time I checked).
  • This is going to be the Corn Laws Redux.

    To think I was criticised on Sunday for calling these leavers 'Hardline'

    Have you read the same letter as me?

    The so-called "hard brexit" the ERG are after is a sort of mid-Brexit. It's certainly harder that the government currently wants, but not so far off that it cannot be fairly easily accommodated.

    The reason it can be accommodated is that it is evident that the principles at stake don't quite match up to the practice. So for example, they might want an end to regulatory oversight from Brussels: but are they really concerned with the European Medicines Agency? Or course not.
    I have, I agree with these interprertations




    Well, yes. It's more "leave" than the government is. But it's not a hardliner's manifesto. Remember JRM is calling for no transition (last time I checked).
    Or to put it another way, this is the letter you write when you want to shape policy, not sit on the sidelines and shout about how badly it's going
  • dixiedeandixiedean Posts: 2,028
    SeanT said:

    dixiedean said:

    SeanT said:

    I have £1000 riding on this, with Mr WilliamGlenn. I find it difficult to believe any Tory leader would survive not Brexiting by that date. It will happen. Though what happens after is anyone's guess.

    Incidentally this story is interesting: secular trends that are shaping our politics. Young people are becoming more risk averse, with all that means. Because of insecurity.

    I can evidence this personally. I asked my 22 year old wife the other day how many of her post-uni friends had returned to live with their parents? She paused, then said "ALL of them".

    Not a single one of my friends, when I was 22, had returned to live with Mum and Dad. The idea was laughable.

    https://www.ft.com/content/66149ea8-158a-11e8-9e9c-25c814761640

    The party that addresses this will win the future.

    However, it has always confused me as to why we have the tradition of leaving home to go to University. Surely more staying at home and going to their local one would be beneficial all round. Many in other countries manage it. I know the idea was not credible in our day, but we didn't pay fees.
    Disagree. One of the best aspects of the British - or English - tradition of higher education is the way it asked kids to be self reliant - to move out - from a relatively early age, 18. It certainly benefited me and made me more resourceful (or devious, if you want to be technical).
    Was not disagreeing. Living in Central London at 19 was wonderful. It gave the opportunity for all kinds of shenanigans.
    But, if you can't afford to live without moving back in, why move out in the first place?
  • glwglw Posts: 4,207
    edited February 20

    He has made a direct threat to the press and tonight the Sun has gone on full attack.

    Why did he not just laugh it off - he hasn't a clue

    Despite their differing politics Trump and Corbyn have a hell of a lot in common.
  • SeanTSeanT Posts: 20,386

    This is going to be the Corn Laws Redux.

    To think I was criticised on Sunday for calling these leavers 'Hardline'

    Have you read the same letter as me?

    The so-called "hard brexit" the ERG are after is a sort of mid-Brexit. It's certainly harder that the government currently wants, but not so far off that it cannot be fairly easily accommodated.

    The reason it can be accommodated is that it is evident that the principles at stake don't quite match up to the practice. So for example, they might want an end to regulatory oversight from Brussels: but are they really concerned with the European Medicines Agency? Or course not.
    I have, I agree with these interprertations




    Well, yes. It's more "leave" than the government is. But it's not a hardliner's manifesto. Remember JRM is calling for no transition (last time I checked).
    Or to put it another way, this is the letter you write when you want to shape policy, not sit on the sidelines and shout about how badly it's going
    The idea TMay could force through a very soft Brexit without Tory MPs kicking back was extremely naive. Compromise will be found.
  • I do not think 2 males pointing guns at a single female in the middle is giving the right message in this climate
  • dixiedeandixiedean Posts: 2,028

    TGOHF said:

    Arf. This pig is being fattened well before polling day.


    He has made a direct threat to the press and tonight the Sun has gone on full attack.

    Why did he not just laugh it off - he hasn't a clue
    Because The Sun is widely distrusted and disbelieved.
  • dixiedean said:

    TGOHF said:

    Arf. This pig is being fattened well before polling day.


    He has made a direct threat to the press and tonight the Sun has gone on full attack.

    Why did he not just laugh it off - he hasn't a clue
    Because The Sun is widely distrusted and disbelieved.
    Has a huge circulation and he is prolonging the story. Also they have photographic evidence
  • PeterCPeterC Posts: 1,042
    dixiedean said:

    dixiedean said:

    SeanT said:

    I have £1000 riding on this, with Mr WilliamGlenn. I find it difficult to believe any Tory leader would survive not Brexiting by that date. It will happen. Though what happens after is anyone's guess.

    Incidentally this story is interesting: secular trends that are shaping our politics. Young people are becoming more risk averse, with all that means. Because of insecurity.

    I can evidence this personally. I asked my 22 year old wife the other day how many of her post-uni friends had returned to live with their parents? She paused, then said "ALL of them".

    Not a single one of my friends, when I was 22, had returned to live with Mum and Dad. The idea was laughable.

    https://www.ft.com/content/66149ea8-158a-11e8-9e9c-25c814761640

    The party that addresses this will win the future.

    However, it has always confused me as to why we have the tradition of leaving home to go to University. Surely more staying at home and going to their local one would be beneficial all round. Many in other countries manage it. I know the idea was not credible in our day, but we didn't pay fees.
    Universities aren't homogenous.

    Your nearest university might not excel in the discipline you're interested in whilst excelling at others.
    Of course I understand that. However, living at home and commuting ought to be the first consideration these days, if at all possible. I speak as the proud Dad of a son who got an interview at Durham today. Moreover, if you live in London or one of the other big conurbations there should be something available for most. There are 7 Universities within an hour by public transport of my childhood home. Not everyone gets on an excellent course at a top institution. In fact the vast majority don't.
    I went to Durham university. Good luck to your son - if he ends up going to Durham he will have a marvellous time.
  • SeanTSeanT Posts: 20,386

    I do not think 2 males pointing guns at a single female in the middle is giving the right message in this climate
    Also just a bit weird.

    Whatever, Brexit is becoming a reality. The Tory party has to unite, and decide. Crucial month ahead.
  • Justin Forsyth caught up in sex harassment with save the children, same charity as Brendan Cox

    What is wrong with these men
  • Boris Johnson described Brexit as “a mess” during a private meeting with senior German officials, European Union sources have claimed.

    Mr Johnson is understood to have been referring to the complex Brexit negotiations rather than the British decision to leave the bloc, which he campaigned for in the referendum.

    During unminuted talks in Berlin, the foreign secretary is alleged by Brussels sources to have urged the Germans to turn Brexit into an economic opportunity.

    However, The Telegraph understands he was rebuffed by the German government, which has repeatedly stood behind Michel Barnier and resisted any attempts to go over the European Union chief Brexit negotiator's head.

    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/politics/2018/02/20/boris-johnson-said-brexit-mess-private-meeting-german-officials/
  • dixiedeandixiedean Posts: 2,028

    dixiedean said:

    TGOHF said:

    Arf. This pig is being fattened well before polling day.


    He has made a direct threat to the press and tonight the Sun has gone on full attack.

    Why did he not just laugh it off - he hasn't a clue
    Because The Sun is widely distrusted and disbelieved.
    Has a huge circulation and he is prolonging the story. Also they have photographic evidence
    Has a rapidly falling circulation of increasingly elderly readers who in the main vote Tory. A newspaper of record it is not. As for photographic evidence...of what exactly? I refer you to the numerous photos of Thatcher with Savile. That didn't make her a serial paedophile.
  • John_MJohn_M Posts: 6,466

    Justin Forsyth caught up in sex harassment with save the children, same charity as Brendan Cox

    What is wrong with these men

    Sexual predators choose careers that enable predation.
  • Danny565Danny565 Posts: 6,793
    edited February 20
    dixiedean said:

    dixiedean said:

    TGOHF said:

    Arf. This pig is being fattened well before polling day.


    He has made a direct threat to the press and tonight the Sun has gone on full attack.

    Why did he not just laugh it off - he hasn't a clue
    Because The Sun is widely distrusted and disbelieved.
    Has a huge circulation and he is prolonging the story. Also they have photographic evidence
    Has a rapidly falling circulation of increasingly elderly readers who in the main vote Tory. A newspaper of record it is not. As for photographic evidence...of what exactly? I refer you to the numerous photos of Thatcher with Savile. That didn't make her a serial paedophile.
    YouGov claims that a not-insubstantial 30% of Sun readers voted Labour last year:

    image
  • Big_G_NorthWalesBig_G_NorthWales Posts: 13,179
    edited February 20
    dixiedean said:

    dixiedean said:

    TGOHF said:

    Arf. This pig is being fattened well before polling day.


    He has made a direct threat to the press and tonight the Sun has gone on full attack.

    Why did he not just laugh it off - he hasn't a clue
    Because The Sun is widely distrusted and disbelieved.
    Has a huge circulation and he is prolonging the story. Also they have photographic evidence
    Has a rapidly falling circulation of increasingly elderly readers who in the main vote Tory. A newspaper of record it is not. As for photographic evidence...of what exactly? I refer you to the numerous photos of Thatcher with Savile. That didn't make her a serial paedophile.
    Trying to dilute the story will not make it go away and do you support Corbyn's threats to the free press.

    By the way good luck to your son
  • John_MJohn_M Posts: 6,466
    PeterC said:

    dixiedean said:

    dixiedean said:

    SeanT said:

    I have £1000 riding on this, with Mr WilliamGlenn. I find it difficult to believe any Tory leader would survive not Brexiting by that date. It will happen. Though what happens after is anyone's guess.

    Incidentally this story is interesting: secular trends that are shaping our politics. Young people are becoming more risk averse, with all that means. Because of insecurity.

    I can evidence this personally. I asked my 22 year old wife the other day how many of her post-uni friends had returned to live with their parents? She paused, then said "ALL of them".

    Not a single one of my friends, when I was 22, had returned to live with Mum and Dad. The idea was laughable.

    https://www.ft.com/content/66149ea8-158a-11e8-9e9c-25c814761640

    The party that addresses this will win the future.

    However, it has always confused me as to why we have the tradition of leaving home to go to University. Surely more staying at home and going to their local one would be beneficial all round. Many in other countries manage it. I know the idea was not credible in our day, but we didn't pay fees.
    Universities aren't homogenous.

    Your nearest university might not excel in the discipline you're interested in whilst excelling at others.
    Of course I understand that. However, living at home and commuting ought to be the first consideration these days, if at all possible. I speak as the proud Dad of a son who got an interview at Durham today. Moreover, if you live in London or one of the other big conurbations there should be something available for most. There are 7 Universities within an hour by public transport of my childhood home. Not everyone gets on an excellent course at a top institution. In fact the vast majority don't.
    I went to Durham university. Good luck to your son - if he ends up going to Durham he will have a marvellous time.
    Getting a room in the castle would be an added plus!
  • SeanTSeanT Posts: 20,386
    John_M said:

    Justin Forsyth caught up in sex harassment with save the children, same charity as Brendan Cox

    What is wrong with these men

    Sexual predators choose careers that enable predation.
    SAVE THE REALLY HOT ONES

    I should have followed my instincts, and actually established that charity. The honesty would appeal in today's climate of transparency.
  • MortimerMortimer Posts: 9,475
    edited February 20

    This is going to be the Corn Laws Redux.

    To think I was criticised on Sunday for calling these leavers 'Hardline'

    Leavers are the Peelites; Remainers are the landed vested interests.

    Plus ca change.
  • FoxyFoxy Posts: 1,788
    I demand a referndum on what sort of dystophic apocalyptic wasteland we become! :



  • John_M said:

    PeterC said:

    dixiedean said:

    dixiedean said:

    SeanT said:

    I have £1000 riding on this, with Mr WilliamGlenn. I find it difficult to believe any Tory leader would survive not Brexiting by that date. It will happen. Though what happens after is anyone's guess.

    Incidentally this story is interesting: secular trends that are shaping our politics. Young people are becoming more risk averse, with all that means. Because of insecurity.

    I can evidence this personally. I asked my 22 year old wife the other day how many of her post-uni friends had returned to live with their parents? She paused, then said "ALL of them".

    Not a single one of my friends, when I was 22, had returned to live with Mum and Dad. The idea was laughable.

    https://www.ft.com/content/66149ea8-158a-11e8-9e9c-25c814761640

    The party that addresses this will win the future.

    However, it has always confused me as to why we have the tradition of leaving home to go to University. Surely more staying at home and going to their local one would be beneficial all round. Many in other countries manage it. I know the idea was not credible in our day, but we didn't pay fees.
    Universities aren't homogenous.

    Your nearest university might not excel in the discipline you're interested in whilst excelling at others.
    Of course I understand that. However, living at home and commuting ought to be the first consideration these days, if at all possible. I speak as the proud Dad of a son who got an interview at Durham today. Moreover, if you live in London or one of the other big conurbations there should be something available for most. There are 7 Universities within an hour by public transport of my childhood home. Not everyone gets on an excellent course at a top institution. In fact the vast majority don't.
    I went to Durham university. Good luck to your son - if he ends up going to Durham he will have a marvellous time.
    Getting a room in the castle would be an added plus!
    Lumley Castle?

    I stayed there last month.

    The King James Suite is something else.
  • dixiedeandixiedean Posts: 2,028
    Danny565 said:

    dixiedean said:

    dixiedean said:

    TGOHF said:

    Arf. This pig is being fattened well before polling day.


    He has made a direct threat to the press and tonight the Sun has gone on full attack.

    Why did he not just laugh it off - he hasn't a clue
    Because The Sun is widely distrusted and disbelieved.
    Has a huge circulation and he is prolonging the story. Also they have photographic evidence
    Has a rapidly falling circulation of increasingly elderly readers who in the main vote Tory. A newspaper of record it is not. As for photographic evidence...of what exactly? I refer you to the numerous photos of Thatcher with Savile. That didn't make her a serial paedophile.
    YouGov claims that a not-insubstantial 30% of Sun readers voted Labour last year:

    image
    So in the main voted Tory then. As for the 30% who voted Labour they quite clearly weren't swayed by the unrivalled political coverage.
  • MortimerMortimer Posts: 9,475
    dixiedean said:

    dixiedean said:

    TGOHF said:

    Arf. This pig is being fattened well before polling day.


    He has made a direct threat to the press and tonight the Sun has gone on full attack.

    Why did he not just laugh it off - he hasn't a clue
    Because The Sun is widely distrusted and disbelieved.
    Has a huge circulation and he is prolonging the story. Also they have photographic evidence
    Has a rapidly falling circulation of increasingly elderly readers who in the main vote Tory. A newspaper of record it is not. As for photographic evidence...of what exactly? I refer you to the numerous photos of Thatcher with Savile. That didn't make her a serial paedophile.
    Suspect the Sun has a much younger readership than most other papers; perhaps all papers with a 1m corciulation...?
  • Danny565Danny565 Posts: 6,793
    dixiedean said:

    Danny565 said:

    dixiedean said:

    dixiedean said:

    TGOHF said:

    Arf. This pig is being fattened well before polling day.


    He has made a direct threat to the press and tonight the Sun has gone on full attack.

    Why did he not just laugh it off - he hasn't a clue
    Because The Sun is widely distrusted and disbelieved.
    Has a huge circulation and he is prolonging the story. Also they have photographic evidence
    Has a rapidly falling circulation of increasingly elderly readers who in the main vote Tory. A newspaper of record it is not. As for photographic evidence...of what exactly? I refer you to the numerous photos of Thatcher with Savile. That didn't make her a serial paedophile.
    YouGov claims that a not-insubstantial 30% of Sun readers voted Labour last year:

    image
    So in the main voted Tory then. As for the 30% who voted Labour they quite clearly weren't swayed by the unrivalled political coverage.
    I wasn't disagreeing with you, I just saw those stats earlier and was quite surprised by them, and wanted an excuse to post it :p
  • dixiedean said:

    Danny565 said:

    dixiedean said:

    dixiedean said:

    TGOHF said:

    Arf. This pig is being fattened well before polling day.


    He has made a direct threat to the press and tonight the Sun has gone on full attack.

    Why did he not just laugh it off - he hasn't a clue
    Because The Sun is widely distrusted and disbelieved.
    Has a huge circulation and he is prolonging the story. Also they have photographic evidence
    Has a rapidly falling circulation of increasingly elderly readers who in the main vote Tory. A newspaper of record it is not. As for photographic evidence...of what exactly? I refer you to the numerous photos of Thatcher with Savile. That didn't make her a serial paedophile.
    YouGov claims that a not-insubstantial 30% of Sun readers voted Labour last year:

    image
    So in the main voted Tory then. As for the 30% who voted Labour they quite clearly weren't swayed by the unrivalled political coverage.
    I would take issue with your idea the readership is elderly - many more WVM readers
  • BenpointerBenpointer Posts: 2,675
    Danny565 said:

    dixiedean said:

    dixiedean said:

    TGOHF said:

    Arf. This pig is being fattened well before polling day.


    He has made a direct threat to the press and tonight the Sun has gone on full attack.

    Why did he not just laugh it off - he hasn't a clue
    Because The Sun is widely distrusted and disbelieved.
    Has a huge circulation and he is prolonging the story. Also they have photographic evidence
    Has a rapidly falling circulation of increasingly elderly readers who in the main vote Tory. A newspaper of record it is not. As for photographic evidence...of what exactly? I refer you to the numerous photos of Thatcher with Savile. That didn't make her a serial paedophile.
    YouGov claims that a not-insubstantial 30% of Sun readers voted Labour last year:

    image
    "30% of Sun readers voted Labour last year:"... despite their constant attacks on Corbyn. I don't think many people are influenced by what the "Sun Says" anymore (if they ever were).
  • RhubarbRhubarb Posts: 330
    Mortimer said:

    dixiedean said:

    dixiedean said:

    TGOHF said:

    Arf. This pig is being fattened well before polling day.


    He has made a direct threat to the press and tonight the Sun has gone on full attack.

    Why did he not just laugh it off - he hasn't a clue
    Because The Sun is widely distrusted and disbelieved.
    Has a huge circulation and he is prolonging the story. Also they have photographic evidence
    Has a rapidly falling circulation of increasingly elderly readers who in the main vote Tory. A newspaper of record it is not. As for photographic evidence...of what exactly? I refer you to the numerous photos of Thatcher with Savile. That didn't make her a serial paedophile.
    Suspect the Sun has a much younger readership than most other papers; perhaps all papers with a 1m corciulation...?
    It had a massive <35yr old readership in 2015.

    http://www.pressgazette.co.uk/mail-uks-most-read-newspaper-brand-under-35s-favour-sun/
  • John_MJohn_M Posts: 6,466
    SeanT said:

    John_M said:

    Justin Forsyth caught up in sex harassment with save the children, same charity as Brendan Cox

    What is wrong with these men

    Sexual predators choose careers that enable predation.
    SAVE THE REALLY HOT ONES

    I should have followed my instincts, and actually established that charity. The honesty would appeal in today's climate of transparency.
    You could really riff off 'Doctors without Boundaries'.
  • PeterCPeterC Posts: 1,042
    John_M said:

    PeterC said:

    dixiedean said:

    dixiedean said:

    SeanT said:

    I have £1000 riding on this, with Mr WilliamGlenn. I find it difficult to believe any Tory leader would survive not Brexiting by that date. It will happen. Though what happens after is anyone's guess.

    Incidentally this story is interesting: secular trends that are shaping our politics. Young people are becoming more risk averse, with all that means. Because of insecurity.

    I can evidence this personally. I asked my 22 year old wife the other day how many of her post-uni friends had returned to live with their parents? She paused, then said "ALL of them".

    Not a single one of my friends, when I was 22, had returned to live with Mum and Dad. The idea was laughable.

    https://www.ft.com/content/66149ea8-158a-11e8-9e9c-25c814761640

    The party that addresses this will win the future.

    However, it has always confused me as to why we have the tradition of leaving home to go to University. Surely more staying at home and going to their local one would be beneficial all round. Many in other countries manage it. I know the idea was not credible in our day, but we didn't pay fees.
    Universities aren't homogenous.

    Your nearest university might not excel in the discipline you're interested in whilst excelling at others.
    Of course I understand that. However, living at home and commuting ought to be the first consideration these days, if at all possible. I speak as the proud Dad of a son who got an interview at Durham today. Moreover, if you live in London or one of the other big conurbations there should be something available for most. There are 7 Universities within an hour by public transport of my childhood home. Not everyone gets on an excellent course at a top institution. In fact the vast majority don't.
    I went to Durham university. Good luck to your son - if he ends up going to Durham he will have a marvellous time.
    Getting a room in the castle would be an added plus!
    I had that too! In 1974 all meals were waitress served. I think things are done in a slightly more expense consious way now.
  • Awb683Awb683 Posts: 21
    The March date won't slip.
  • dixiedeandixiedean Posts: 2,028

    dixiedean said:

    dixiedean said:

    TGOHF said:

    Arf. This pig is being fattened well before polling day.


    He has made a direct threat to the press and tonight the Sun has gone on full attack.

    Why did he not just laugh it off - he hasn't a clue
    Because The Sun is widely distrusted and disbelieved.
    Has a huge circulation and he is prolonging the story. Also they have photographic evidence
    Has a rapidly falling circulation of increasingly elderly readers who in the main vote Tory. A newspaper of record it is not. As for photographic evidence...of what exactly? I refer you to the numerous photos of Thatcher with Savile. That didn't make her a serial paedophile.
    Trying to dilute the story will not make it go away and do you support Corbyn's threats to the free press.

    By the way good luck to your son
    If by threat you mean his support for Leveson 2 thus change, then no I do not personally. I find it difficult to dilute a story which has one source, one who claims to have organised Live Aid. If any more comes out, I can re assess.
    Thanks for your kind remarks.
  • dixiedeandixiedean Posts: 2,028
    PeterC said:

    dixiedean said:

    dixiedean said:

    SeanT said:

    I have £1000 riding on this, with Mr WilliamGlenn. I find it difficult to believe any Tory leader would survive not Brexiting by that date. It will happen. Though what happens after is anyone's guess.

    Incidentally this story is interesting: secular trends that are shaping our politics. Young people are becoming more risk averse, with all that means. Because of insecurity.

    I can evidence this personally. I asked my 22 year old wife the other day how many of her post-uni friends had returned to live with their parents? She paused, then said "ALL of them".

    Not a single one of my friends, when I was 22, had returned to live with Mum and Dad. The idea was laughable.

    https://www.ft.com/content/66149ea8-158a-11e8-9e9c-25c814761640

    The party that addresses this will win the future.

    However, it has always confused me as to why we have the tradition of leaving home to go to University. Surely more staying at home and going to their local one would be beneficial all round. Many in other countries manage it. I know the idea was not credible in our day, but we didn't pay fees.
    Universities aren't homogenous.

    Your nearest university might not excel in the discipline you're interested in whilst excelling at others.
    Of course I understand that. However, living at home and commuting ought to be the first consideration these days, if at all possible. I speak as the proud Dad of a son who got an interview at Durham today. Moreover, if you live in London or one of the other big conurbations there should be something available for most. There are 7 Universities within an hour by public transport of my childhood home. Not everyone gets on an excellent course at a top institution. In fact the vast majority don't.
    I went to Durham university. Good luck to your son - if he ends up going to Durham he will have a marvellous time.
    Thank you.
  • MarqueeMarkMarqueeMark Posts: 17,465
    dixiedean said:

    PeterC said:

    dixiedean said:

    dixiedean said:

    SeanT said:

    I have £1000 riding on this, with Mr WilliamGlenn. I find it difficult to believe any Tory leader would survive not Brexiting by that date. It will happen. Though what happens after is anyone's guess.

    Incidentally this story is interesting: secular trends that are shaping our politics. Young people are becoming more risk averse, with all that means. Because of insecurity.

    I can evidence this personally. I asked my 22 year old wife the other day how many of her post-uni friends had returned to live with their parents? She paused, then said "ALL of them".

    Not a single one of my friends, when I was 22, had returned to live with Mum and Dad. The idea was laughable.

    https://www.ft.com/content/66149ea8-158a-11e8-9e9c-25c814761640

    The party that addresses this will win the future.

    However, it has always confused me as to why we have the tradition of leaving home to go to University. Surely more staying at home and going to their local one would be beneficial all round. Many in other countries manage it. I know the idea was not credible in our day, but we didn't pay fees.
    Universities aren't homogenous.

    Your nearest university might not excel in the discipline you're interested in whilst excelling at others.
    Of course I understand that. However, living at home and commuting ought to be the first consideration these days, if at all possible. I speak as the proud Dad of a son who got an interview at Durham today. Moreover, if you live in London or one of the other big conurbations there should be something available for most. There are 7 Universities within an hour by public transport of my childhood home. Not everyone gets on an excellent course at a top institution. In fact the vast majority don't.
    I went to Durham university. Good luck to your son - if he ends up going to Durham he will have a marvellous time.
    Thank you.
    One of the most gorgeous locations for a University. But in my time, the Christian Union was the biggest society. There's a need for regular escapades to Newcastle!
  • dixiedeandixiedean Posts: 2,028
    John_M said:

    SeanT said:

    John_M said:

    Justin Forsyth caught up in sex harassment with save the children, same charity as Brendan Cox

    What is wrong with these men

    Sexual predators choose careers that enable predation.
    SAVE THE REALLY HOT ONES

    I should have followed my instincts, and actually established that charity. The honesty would appeal in today's climate of transparency.
    You could really riff off 'Doctors without Boundaries'.
    Medicins sans Brasierres?
  • PeterCPeterC Posts: 1,042
    edited February 20

    dixiedean said:

    PeterC said:

    dixiedean said:

    dixiedean said:

    SeanT said:

    I have £1000 riding on this, with Mr WilliamGlenn. I find it difficult to believe any Tory leader would survive not Brexiting by that date. It will happen. Though what happens after is anyone's guess.

    Incidentally this story is interesting: secular trends that are shaping our politics. Young people are becoming more risk averse, with all that means. Because of insecurity.

    I can evidence this personally. I asked my 22 year old wife the other day how many of her post-uni friends had returned to live with their parents? She paused, then said "ALL of them".

    Not a single one of my friends, when I was 22, had returned to live with Mum and Dad. The idea was laughable.

    https://www.ft.com/content/66149ea8-158a-11e8-9e9c-25c814761640

    The party that addresses this will win the future.

    However, it has always confused me as to why we have the tradition of leaving home to go to University. Surely more staying at home and going to their local one would be beneficial all round. Many in other countries manage it. I know the idea was not credible in our day, but we didn't pay fees.
    Universities aren't homogenous.

    Your nearest university might not excel in the discipline you're interested in whilst excelling at others.
    Of course I understand that. However, living at home and commuting ought to be the first consideration these days, if at all possible. I speak as the proud Dad of a son who got an interview at Durham today. Moreover, if you live in London or one of the other big conurbations there should be something available for most. There are 7 Universities within an hour by public transport of my childhood home. Not everyone gets on an excellent course at a top institution. In fact the vast majority don't.
    I went to Durham university. Good luck to your son - if he ends up going to Durham he will have a marvellous time.
    Thank you.
    One of the most gorgeous locations for a University. But in my time, the Christian Union was the biggest society. There's a need for regular escapades to Newcastle!
    When were you up there? And what did you get up to in Newcastle??
  • John_MJohn_M Posts: 6,466
    dixiedean said:

    John_M said:

    SeanT said:

    John_M said:

    Justin Forsyth caught up in sex harassment with save the children, same charity as Brendan Cox

    What is wrong with these men

    Sexual predators choose careers that enable predation.
    SAVE THE REALLY HOT ONES

    I should have followed my instincts, and actually established that charity. The honesty would appeal in today's climate of transparency.
    You could really riff off 'Doctors without Boundaries'.
    Medicins sans Brasierres?
    Love it :).
  • dixiedean said:

    dixiedean said:

    dixiedean said:

    TGOHF said:

    Arf. This pig is being fattened well before polling day.


    He has made a direct threat to the press and tonight the Sun has gone on full attack.

    Why did he not just laugh it off - he hasn't a clue
    Because The Sun is widely distrusted and disbelieved.
    Has a huge circulation and he is prolonging the story. Also they have photographic evidence
    Has a rapidly falling circulation of increasingly elderly readers who in the main vote Tory. A newspaper of record it is not. As for photographic evidence...of what exactly? I refer you to the numerous photos of Thatcher with Savile. That didn't make her a serial paedophile.
    Trying to dilute the story will not make it go away and do you support Corbyn's threats to the free press.

    By the way good luck to your son
    If by threat you mean his support for Leveson 2 thus change, then no I do not personally. I find it difficult to dilute a story which has one source, one who claims to have organised Live Aid. If any more comes out, I can re assess.
    Thanks for your kind remarks.
    It is his rant that has created a firestorm for him and made the story all the more likely to be in the headlines over his threats to press freedom. The Express has joined in tonight and I doubt the Telegraph or Mail will go quiet on the story.

    Still it is just another part of our crazy politics.

    Have a good night as it is getting past this oldies bed time and cup of horlicks !!!!!!

  • FF43FF43 Posts: 6,425

    TGOHF said:

    Arf. This pig is being fattened well before polling day.


    He has made a direct threat to the press and tonight the Sun has gone on full attack.

    Why did he not just laugh it off - he hasn't a clue
    Because quite clearly the Corbyn as spy story is fake news. It depends entirely on the testimony of a very unreliable handler who contradicts what he himself recorded in the records at the time. Real spies are plentiful and easy to find, but Corbyn wasn't one of them.

    This article makes an interesting point. Although Corbyn had, and still has, a reputation for being hard left, his sympathy wasn't with the Czech state. It was with the dissidents of that state

    https://www.theguardian.com/politics/2018/feb/20/no-evidence-corbyn-was-spy-for-czechoslovakia-say-intelligence-experts
  • RoyalBlueRoyalBlue Posts: 1,938
    The Left can’t wait for press regulation. Look how they tried to sneak it as an amendment into another bill recently in the House of Lords.

    They have given up on democracy. False consciousness is too powerful. Other means must be found.
  • dixiedeandixiedean Posts: 2,028

    dixiedean said:

    dixiedean said:

    dixiedean said:

    TGOHF said:

    Arf. This pig is being fattened well before polling day.


    He has made a direct threat to the press and tonight the Sun has gone on full attack.

    Why did he not just laugh it off - he hasn't a clue
    Because The Sun is widely distrusted and disbelieved.
    Has a huge circulation and he is prolonging the story. Also they have photographic evidence
    Has a rapidly falling circulation of increasingly elderly readers who in the main vote Tory. A newspaper of record it is not. As for photographic evidence...of what exactly? I refer you to the numerous photos of Thatcher with Savile. That didn't make her a serial paedophile.
    Trying to dilute the story will not make it go away and do you support Corbyn's threats to the free press.

    By the way good luck to your son
    If by threat you mean his support for Leveson 2 thus change, then no I do not personally. I find it difficult to dilute a story which has one source, one who claims to have organised Live Aid. If any more comes out, I can re assess.
    Thanks for your kind remarks.
    It is his rant that has created a firestorm for him and made the story all the more likely to be in the headlines over his threats to press freedom. The Express has joined in tonight and I doubt the Telegraph or Mail will go quiet on the story.

    Still it is just another part of our crazy politics.

    Have a good night as it is getting past this oldies bed time and cup of horlicks !!!!!!

    Good night to you too.
  • Dura_AceDura_Ace Posts: 1,419
    dixiedean said:

    I speak as the proud Dad of a son who got an interview at Durham today.

    Another vote for Durham from another Durham graduate here... Although by the end of my second year I had the complexion of Gollum due to lack of exposure to UV light.
  • SeanTSeanT Posts: 20,386
    FF43 said:

    TGOHF said:

    Arf. This pig is being fattened well before polling day.


    He has made a direct threat to the press and tonight the Sun has gone on full attack.

    Why did he not just laugh it off - he hasn't a clue
    Because quite clearly the Corbyn as spy story is fake news. It depends entirely on the testimony of a very unreliable handler who contradicts what he himself recorded in the records at the time. Real spies are plentiful and easy to find, but Corbyn wasn't one of them.

    This article makes an interesting point. Although Corbyn had, and still has, a reputation for being hard left, his sympathy wasn't with the Czech state. It was with the dissidents of that state

    https://www.theguardian.com/politics/2018/feb/20/no-evidence-corbyn-was-spy-for-czechoslovakia-say-intelligence-experts
    Bollocks. Corbyn was happy to consort with anyone who hated Britain, America and Israel. His record is utterly consistent. It's not "one source", it is a repeated pattern of behaviour, from an early age, in a fairly unintelligent man, known for never changing his mind.

    Did he sell valuable secrets to the Warsaw Pact? Of course not. He didn't have any. Did he meet with Warsaw Pact spies, flattered by their attention, and sympathetic to their cause? Of course he did.
  • MarqueeMarkMarqueeMark Posts: 17,465
    PeterC said:

    dixiedean said:

    PeterC said:

    dixiedean said:

    dixiedean said:

    SeanT said:

    I have £1000 riding on this, with Mr WilliamGlenn. I find it difficult to believe any Tory leader would survive not Brexiting by that date. It will happen. Though what happens after is anyone's guess.

    Incidentally this story is interesting: secular trends that are shaping our politics. Young people are becoming more risk averse, with all that means. Because of insecurity.

    I can evidence this personally. I asked my 22 year old wife the other day how many of her post-uni friends had returned to live with their parents? She paused, then said "ALL of them".

    Not a single one of my friends, when I was 22, had returned to live with Mum and Dad. The idea was laughable.

    https://www.ft.com/content/66149ea8-158a-11e8-9e9c-25c814761640

    The party that addresses this will win the future.

    However, it has always confused me as to why we have the tradition of leaving home to go to University. Surely more staying at home and going to their local one would be beneficial all round. Many in other countries manage it. I know the idea was not credible in our day, but we didn't pay fees.
    Universities aren't homogenous.

    Your nearest university might not excel in the discipline you're interested in whilst excelling at others.
    Of course I understand that. However, living at home and commuting ought to be the first consideration these days, if at all possible. I speak as the proud Dad of a son who got an interview at Durham today. Moreover, if you live in London or one of the other big conurbations there should be something available for most. There are 7 Universities within an hour by public transport of my childhood home. Not everyone gets on an excellent course at a top institution. In fact the vast majority don't.
    I went to Durham university. Good luck to your son - if he ends up going to Durham he will have a marvellous time.
    Thank you.
    One of the most gorgeous locations for a University. But in my time, the Christian Union was the biggest society. There's a need for regular escapades to Newcastle!
    When were you up there? And what did you get up to in Newcastle??
    78-81. We'd go up there for bigger bands, the RSC productions that got taken up there - and just a general liveliness that was missing in Durham. It's only a hop up the line on the train.

  • dixiedeandixiedean Posts: 2,028
    Dura_Ace said:

    dixiedean said:

    I speak as the proud Dad of a son who got an interview at Durham today.

    Another vote for Durham from another Durham graduate here... Although by the end of my second year I had the complexion of Gollum due to lack of exposure to UV light.
    Thanks. He's from Northumberland though. So he'll need sunblock.
  • FF43FF43 Posts: 6,425
    SeanT said:

    FF43 said:

    TGOHF said:

    Arf. This pig is being fattened well before polling day.


    He has made a direct threat to the press and tonight the Sun has gone on full attack.

    Why did he not just laugh it off - he hasn't a clue
    Because quite clearly the Corbyn as spy story is fake news. It depends entirely on the testimony of a very unreliable handler who contradicts what he himself recorded in the records at the time. Real spies are plentiful and easy to find, but Corbyn wasn't one of them.

    This article makes an interesting point. Although Corbyn had, and still has, a reputation for being hard left, his sympathy wasn't with the Czech state. It was with the dissidents of that state

    https://www.theguardian.com/politics/2018/feb/20/no-evidence-corbyn-was-spy-for-czechoslovakia-say-intelligence-experts
    Bollocks. Corbyn was happy to consort with anyone who hated Britain, America and Israel. His record is utterly consistent. It's not "one source", it is a repeated pattern of behaviour, from an early age, in a fairly unintelligent man, known for never changing his mind.

    Did he sell valuable secrets to the Warsaw Pact? Of course not. He didn't have any. Did he meet with Warsaw Pact spies, flattered by their attention, and sympathetic to their cause? Of course he did.

    Corbyn has his fair share of skeletons, but I think he's on firm ground with the spy claims. Which, I believe, is why he is standing it.
  • SeanTSeanT Posts: 20,386
    FF43 said:

    SeanT said:

    FF43 said:

    TGOHF said:

    Arf. This pig is being fattened well before polling day.


    He has made a direct threat to the press and tonight the Sun has gone on full attack.

    Why did he not just laugh it off - he hasn't a clue
    Because quite clearly the Corbyn as spy story is fake news. It depends entirely on the testimony of a very unreliable handler who contradicts what he himself recorded in the records at the time. Real spies are plentiful and easy to find, but Corbyn wasn't one of them.

    This article makes an interesting point. Although Corbyn had, and still has, a reputation for being hard left, his sympathy wasn't with the Czech state. It was with the dissidents of that state

    https://www.theguardian.com/politics/2018/feb/20/no-evidence-corbyn-was-spy-for-czechoslovakia-say-intelligence-experts
    Bollocks. Corbyn was happy to consort with anyone who hated Britain, America and Israel. His record is utterly consistent. It's not "one source", it is a repeated pattern of behaviour, from an early age, in a fairly unintelligent man, known for never changing his mind.

    Did he sell valuable secrets to the Warsaw Pact? Of course not. He didn't have any. Did he meet with Warsaw Pact spies, flattered by their attention, and sympathetic to their cause? Of course he did.

    Corbyn has his fair share of skeletons, but I think he's on firm ground with the spy claims. Which, I believe, is why he is standing it.
    Anyone who calls him a spy is an idiot. Traitor is fair comment, and almost certainly true.
  • MarqueeMarkMarqueeMark Posts: 17,465
    FF43 said:

    SeanT said:

    FF43 said:

    TGOHF said:

    Arf. This pig is being fattened well before polling day.


    He has made a direct threat to the press and tonight the Sun has gone on full attack.

    Why did he not just laugh it off - he hasn't a clue
    Because quite clearly the Corbyn as spy story is fake news. It depends entirely on the testimony of a very unreliable handler who contradicts what he himself recorded in the records at the time. Real spies are plentiful and easy to find, but Corbyn wasn't one of them.

    This article makes an interesting point. Although Corbyn had, and still has, a reputation for being hard left, his sympathy wasn't with the Czech state. It was with the dissidents of that state

    https://www.theguardian.com/politics/2018/feb/20/no-evidence-corbyn-was-spy-for-czechoslovakia-say-intelligence-experts
    Bollocks. Corbyn was happy to consort with anyone who hated Britain, America and Israel. His record is utterly consistent. It's not "one source", it is a repeated pattern of behaviour, from an early age, in a fairly unintelligent man, known for never changing his mind.

    Did he sell valuable secrets to the Warsaw Pact? Of course not. He didn't have any. Did he meet with Warsaw Pact spies, flattered by their attention, and sympathetic to their cause? Of course he did.

    Corbyn has his fair share of skeletons, but I think he's on firm ground with the spy claims. Which, I believe, is why he is standing it.
    Like he could take any other position if he were guilty!
  • NigelbNigelb Posts: 5,184
    Mr Trump, listen, and understand. That Mueller is out there. It can’t be bargained with*. It can’t be reasoned with. It doesn’t feel pity, or remorse, or fear. And it absolutely will not stop, ever, until you are (politically) dead.


    * Though if one of your associates wishes to shop you, a plea bargain might be arranged.
  • bigjohnowlsbigjohnowls Posts: 9,629
    FF43 said:

    SeanT said:

    FF43 said:

    TGOHF said:

    Arf. This pig is being fattened well before polling day.


    He has made a direct threat to the press and tonight the Sun has gone on full attack.

    Why did he not just laugh it off - he hasn't a clue
    Because quite clearly the Corbyn as spy story is fake news. It depends entirely on the testimony of a very unreliable handler who contradicts what he himself recorded in the records at the time. Real spies are plentiful and easy to find, but Corbyn wasn't one of them.

    This article makes an interesting point. Although Corbyn had, and still has, a reputation for being hard left, his sympathy wasn't with the Czech state. It was with the dissidents of that state

    https://www.theguardian.com/politics/2018/feb/20/no-evidence-corbyn-was-spy-for-czechoslovakia-say-intelligence-experts
    Bollocks. Corbyn was happy to consort with anyone who hated Britain, America and Israel. His record is utterly consistent. It's not "one source", it is a repeated pattern of behaviour, from an early age, in a fairly unintelligent man, known for never changing his mind.

    Did he sell valuable secrets to the Warsaw Pact? Of course not. He didn't have any. Did he meet with Warsaw Pact spies, flattered by their attention, and sympathetic to their cause? Of course he did.

    Corbyn has his fair share of skeletons, but I think he's on firm ground with the spy claims. Which, I believe, is why he is standing it.
    CHANGE IS COMING

  • TGOHFTGOHF Posts: 17,457
    Corbyn will be crushed by his own command and control KGB style entourage who want to control every minutiae of his life and coverage and to cover up the vacuum within - a dull, thick , lefie.

    Like a black hole collapsing on itself he will be pushed inwards to an insignificant dot.
  • Y0kelY0kel Posts: 2,125
    edited February 20
    Corbyn may not have been an agent for Soviet Bloc intelligence in the popular view of the term but he was a logical target for an approach, and at a minimum, would have been seen as a developmental case, a 'we might get a little, we might get a lot from him'.

    Some potential uses of someone like Jeremy Corbyn back in the day
    -Conduit for political analysis information
    -Conduit to disseminate disruptive information supplied by the intelligence agency
    -A 'bring friends' source to our east-west friendship society meetings and tours to the spade making factories of Slovakia. i.e. a conduit to expanding networks

    Did he act as any of those? We might well find out.

    Any chance he wasn't aware Eastern European officials he met might be working for their home intelligence agencies? Not a fucking chance. So, if he was doing any of the above three to any extent (read 'multiple occasions' or 'regular'), he was doing work for those agencies. The Soviet Bloc agencies have a series of terminologies for those that they target. Agent possibly wasn't one of them but 'contact' for example might have been.
  • bigjohnowlsbigjohnowls Posts: 9,629
    Jezza gives me hope that CHANGE IS COMING
  • Y0kelY0kel Posts: 2,125

    Jezza gives me hope that CHANGE IS COMING

    Socialism. Expecting others to make change in your favour and on your behalf.....
  • bigjohnowlsbigjohnowls Posts: 9,629
    Y0kel said:

    Jezza gives me hope that CHANGE IS COMING

    Socialism. Expecting others to make change in your favour and on your behalf.....
    Changes for the Many not the Few are on there way.

    A press free of a handful of tax exiles
  • FoxyFoxy Posts: 1,788

    FF43 said:

    SeanT said:

    FF43 said:

    TGOHF said:

    Arf. This pig is being fattened well before polling day.


    He has made a direct threat to the press and tonight the Sun has gone on full attack.

    Why did he not just laugh it off - he hasn't a clue
    Because quite clearly the Corbyn as spy story is fake news. It depends entirely on the testimony of a very unreliable handler who contradicts what he himself recorded in the records at the time. Real spies are plentiful and easy to find, but Corbyn wasn't one of them.

    This article makes an interesting point. Although Corbyn had, and still has, a reputation for being hard left, his sympathy wasn't with the Czech state. It was with the dissidents of that state

    https://www.theguardian.com/politics/2018/feb/20/no-evidence-corbyn-was-spy-for-czechoslovakia-say-intelligence-experts
    Bollocks. Corbyn was happy to consort with anyone who hated Britain, America and Israel. His record is utterly consistent. It's not "one source", it is a repeated pattern of behaviour, from an early age, in a fairly unintelligent man, known for never changing his mind.

    Did he sell valuable secrets to the Warsaw Pact? Of course not. He didn't have any. Did he meet with Warsaw Pact spies, flattered by their attention, and sympathetic to their cause? Of course he did.

    Corbyn has his fair share of skeletons, but I think he's on firm ground with the spy claims. Which, I believe, is why he is standing it.
    CHANGE IS COMING

    One of the best things about a Cotbyn premiership will be the end of the press barons.

    Let them dig salt.
  • SeanTSeanT Posts: 20,386
    Here's an FT article which laments that Brexit will leave Britain as a bigger version of Canada, often frustrated by a much larger economic entity on its doorstep.

    I'm not sure that the writer grasps that being a "bigger, richer, more influential Canada, able to set its own trade and migration policies, but annoyed by Europe from time to time" will sound rather appealing to a lot of Britons.

    https://www.ft.com/content/e72bf154-1566-11e8-9376-4a6390addb44

    Canada is regularly listed as one of the best places to live in the world. It is peaceful and prosperous. If we can have what they have, along with (unusually) better weather, a peerless location for fun and business, and a much grander history, PLUS all the cultural richness of Europe without the political hassle, then I think most voters would say YAY: Bring It On.

  • PClippPClipp Posts: 1,467
    SeanT said:

    I do not think 2 males pointing guns at a single female in the middle is giving the right message in this climate
    Also just a bit weird.
    Whatever, Brexit is becoming a reality. The Tory party has to unite, and decide. Crucial month ahead.
    I thought the Tory Party had decided way back in the days of Edward Heath. Except that some of them didn`t. They just hung around - like a bad smell - and never went away. Now they have taken over the Tory Party. And are hell-bent on wrecking the country.
  • Y0kelY0kel Posts: 2,125

    Y0kel said:

    Jezza gives me hope that CHANGE IS COMING

    Socialism. Expecting others to make change in your favour and on your behalf.....
    Changes for the Many not the Few are on there way.

    A press free of a handful of tax exiles
    You got two words the wrong way around there. Should read.

    'A free press'

    You're welcome.
  • OchEyeOchEye Posts: 1,086
    Y0kel said:

    Jezza gives me hope that CHANGE IS COMING

    Socialism. Expecting others to make change in your favour and on your behalf.....
    Capitalism: Expecting others to make change in your favour and on your behalf..... Two sides of the same coin.. ...
  • RobDRobD Posts: 31,859
    OchEye said:

    Y0kel said:

    Jezza gives me hope that CHANGE IS COMING

    Socialism. Expecting others to make change in your favour and on your behalf.....
    Capitalism: Expecting others to make change in your favour and on your behalf..... Two sides of the same coin.. ...
    I thought capitalism was all about being in it for yourself?
  • FoxyFoxy Posts: 1,788
    SeanT said:

    Here's an FT article which laments that Brexit will leave Britain as a bigger version of Canada, often frustrated by a much larger economic entity on its doorstep.

    I'm not sure that the writer grasps that being a "bigger, richer, more influential Canada, able to set its own trade and migration policies, but annoyed by Europe from time to time" will sound rather appealing to a lot of Britons.

    https://www.ft.com/content/e72bf154-1566-11e8-9376-4a6390addb44

    Canada is regularly listed as one of the best places to live in the world. It is peaceful and prosperous. If we can have what they have, along with (unusually) better weather, a peerless location for fun and business, and a much grander history, PLUS all the cultural richness of Europe without the political hassle, then I think most voters would say YAY: Bring It On.

    Canada is also probably the OECD country most open to immigration, and at a per capita rate substantially higher than the UK.
  • Y0kelY0kel Posts: 2,125
    OchEye said:

    Y0kel said:

    Jezza gives me hope that CHANGE IS COMING

    Socialism. Expecting others to make change in your favour and on your behalf.....
    Capitalism: Expecting others to make change in your favour and on your behalf..... Two sides of the same coin.. ...
    Meritocracy: Making change in your favour by doing it yourself.
  • SeanTSeanT Posts: 20,386
    Foxy said:

    SeanT said:

    Here's an FT article which laments that Brexit will leave Britain as a bigger version of Canada, often frustrated by a much larger economic entity on its doorstep.

    I'm not sure that the writer grasps that being a "bigger, richer, more influential Canada, able to set its own trade and migration policies, but annoyed by Europe from time to time" will sound rather appealing to a lot of Britons.

    https://www.ft.com/content/e72bf154-1566-11e8-9376-4a6390addb44

    Canada is regularly listed as one of the best places to live in the world. It is peaceful and prosperous. If we can have what they have, along with (unusually) better weather, a peerless location for fun and business, and a much grander history, PLUS all the cultural richness of Europe without the political hassle, then I think most voters would say YAY: Bring It On.

    Canada is also probably the OECD country most open to immigration, and at a per capita rate substantially higher than the UK.
    Sure. Because Canada is massive, and very empty. I imagine densely-populated Britain would choose a much more restrictive immigration policy. That's the point.

    We get to CHOOSE.
  • MaxPBMaxPB Posts: 13,907
    OchEye said:

    Y0kel said:

    Jezza gives me hope that CHANGE IS COMING

    Socialism. Expecting others to make change in your favour and on your behalf.....
    Capitalism: Expecting others to make change in your favour and on your behalf..... Two sides of the same coin.. ...
    What kind of capitalism is that?!?

    Surely more a case of expecting others to make changes in favour of themselves and following suit
  • Jezza gives me hope that CHANGE IS COMING

    A change for the worse. For everyone. That is socialism for you. Everyone is equally screwed.
  • DecrepitJohnLDecrepitJohnL Posts: 7,741
    dixiedean said:

    dixiedean said:

    SeanT said:

    I have £1000 riding on this, with Mr WilliamGlenn. I find it difficult to believe any Tory leader would survive not Brexiting by that date. It will happen. Though what happens after is anyone's guess.

    Incidentally this story is interesting: secular trends that are shaping our politics. Young people are becoming more risk averse, with all that means. Because of insecurity.

    I can evidence this personally. I asked my 22 year old wife the other day how many of her post-uni friends had returned to live with their parents? She paused, then said "ALL of them".

    Not a single one of my friends, when I was 22, had returned to live with Mum and Dad. The idea was laughable.

    https://www.ft.com/content/66149ea8-158a-11e8-9e9c-25c814761640

    The party that addresses this will win the future.

    However, it has always confused me as to why we have the tradition of leaving home to go to University. Surely more staying at home and going to their local one would be beneficial all round. Many in other countries manage it. I know the idea was not credible in our day, but we didn't pay fees.
    Universities aren't homogenous.

    Your nearest university might not excel in the discipline you're interested in whilst excelling at others.
    Of course I understand that. However, living at home and commuting ought to be the first consideration these days, if at all possible. I speak as the proud Dad of a son who got an interview at Durham today. Moreover, if you live in London or one of the other big conurbations there should be something available for most. There are 7 Universities within an hour by public transport of my childhood home. Not everyone gets on an excellent course at a top institution. In fact the vast majority don't.
    Anecdata is dangerous but in my experience, students living at home were more likely to drop out -- presumably because their social lives remained with their old, non-student friends, whereas those on campus or in digs were surrounded by other students, so however hard they partied, there were always the social cues to study when appropriate.
  • rkrkrkrkrkrk Posts: 3,819
    [small spoiler for game of thrones]








    Isn’t that the trick Tyrion Lannister uses in GoT tv series?
    Bet they got it from there!
  • Dura_AceDura_Ace Posts: 1,419
    rkrkrk said:






    Isn’t that the trick Tyrion Lannister uses in GoT tv series?
    Bet they got it from there!

    GRRM stole it from Gene Rodenberry.
  • TheJezziahTheJezziah Posts: 660
    FF43 said:

    TGOHF said:

    Arf. This pig is being fattened well before polling day.


    He has made a direct threat to the press and tonight the Sun has gone on full attack.

    Why did he not just laugh it off - he hasn't a clue
    Because quite clearly the Corbyn as spy story is fake news. It depends entirely on the testimony of a very unreliable handler who contradicts what he himself recorded in the records at the time. Real spies are plentiful and easy to find, but Corbyn wasn't one of them.

    This article makes an interesting point. Although Corbyn had, and still has, a reputation for being hard left, his sympathy wasn't with the Czech state. It was with the dissidents of that state

    https://www.theguardian.com/politics/2018/feb/20/no-evidence-corbyn-was-spy-for-czechoslovakia-say-intelligence-experts
    I think that is all a bit advanced for the Dan Hodges crew, it doesn't play into the good vs evil narrative they have constructed in their mind. I think some of the right wing press in America have a similar approach, they'll happily share or promote stories that they know are false in order to push the narrative. I think a lot of people enjoy the simplicity of it.
  • rkrkrkrkrkrk Posts: 3,819
    BBC reporting Trump pushing for ban on bump stocks and even open to an age limit on assault rifles. Both would be broadly popular but I think very unpopular with his base? They’ll forgive a lot but would the forgive this?

    Would be very awkward for Dems if they have to give gun control credit to Trump.
  • JosiasJessopJosiasJessop Posts: 19,334
    Foxy said:

    FF43 said:

    SeanT said:

    FF43 said:

    TGOHF said:

    Arf. This pig is being fattened well before polling day.


    He has made a direct threat to the press and tonight the Sun has gone on full attack.

    Why did he not just laugh it off - he hasn't a clue
    Because quite clearly the Corbyn as spy story is fake news. It depends entirely on the testimony of a very unreliable handler who contradicts what he himself recorded in the records at the time. Real spies are plentiful and easy to find, but Corbyn wasn't one of them.

    This article makes an interesting point. Although Corbyn had, and still has, a reputation for being hard left, his sympathy wasn't with the Czech state. It was with the dissidents of that state

    https://www.theguardian.com/politics/2018/feb/20/no-evidence-corbyn-was-spy-for-czechoslovakia-say-intelligence-experts
    Bollocks. Corbyn was happy to consort with anyone who hated Britain, America and Israel. His record is utterly consistent. It's not "one source", it is a repeated pattern of behaviour, from an early age, in a fairly unintelligent man, known for never changing his mind.

    Did he sell valuable secrets to the Warsaw Pact? Of course not. He didn't have any. Did he meet with Warsaw Pact spies, flattered by their attention, and sympathetic to their cause? Of course he did.

    Corbyn has his fair share of skeletons, but I think he's on firm ground with the spy claims. Which, I believe, is why he is standing it.
    CHANGE IS COMING

    One of the best things about a Cotbyn premiership will be the end of the press barons.

    Let them dig salt.
    You want change (fair enough), but seem unconcerned about what that change might lead to.

    That's worrying, as change can always lead to worse outcomes. In this case, we have some good pointers. The Leveson recommendations - supported and encouraged by Labour - are not going to lead to a freer press. Worse, I don't even hear Corbyn going on about the need for a free press.

    But you also have to look closer. Corbyn is complaining about smears. His deputy is Tom Watson. An evil man - and I use that word purposefully - who willingly uses that same media to smear people with sexual abuse allegations whilst wearing a tinfoil-hat - though only about the opposition, not his own side. A man who also wants to mould the media to his party's own advantage.

    You may want a media shorn of 'media barons'. I'm unsure that you have fully considered whether this Labour team would replace those owners with something better for the country, or worse.
  • SandpitSandpit Posts: 17,417
    rkrkrk said:

    BBC reporting Trump pushing for ban on bump stocks and even open to an age limit on assault rifles. Both would be broadly popular but I think very unpopular with his base? They’ll forgive a lot but would the forgive this?

    Would be very awkward for Dems if they have to give gun control credit to Trump.

    Very good politics from Trump. 95% of the population are going to support banning turning regular guns into automatics and the other 5% are solid Republicans anyway.
  • SandpitSandpit Posts: 17,417
    edited February 21

    Foxy said:

    FF43 said:

    SeanT said:

    FF43 said:

    TGOHF said:

    Bollocks. Corbyn was happy to consort with anyone who hated Britain, America and Israel. His record is utterly consistent. It's not "one source", it is a repeated pattern of behaviour, from an early age, in a fairly unintelligent man, known for never changing his mind.

    Did he sell valuable secrets to the Warsaw Pact? Of course not. He didn't have any. Did he meet with Warsaw Pact spies, flattered by their attention, and sympathetic to their cause? Of course he did.

    Corbyn has his fair share of skeletons, but I think he's on firm ground with the spy claims. Which, I believe, is why he is standing it.
    CHANGE IS COMING

    One of the best things about a Cotbyn premiership will be the end of the press barons.

    Let them dig salt.
    You want change (fair enough), but seem unconcerned about what that change might lead to.

    That's worrying, as change can always lead to worse outcomes. In this case, we have some good pointers. The Leveson recommendations - supported and encouraged by Labour - are not going to lead to a freer press. Worse, I don't even hear Corbyn going on about the need for a free press.

    But you also have to look closer. Corbyn is complaining about smears. His deputy is Tom Watson. An evil man - and I use that word purposefully - who willingly uses that same media to smear people with sexual abuse allegations whilst wearing a tinfoil-hat - though only about the opposition, not his own side. A man who also wants to mould the media to his party's own advantage.

    You may want a media shorn of 'media barons'. I'm unsure that you have fully considered whether this Labour team would replace those owners with something better for the country, or worse.
    Quite. Whatever we may think about some of the media from time to time, a free press is fundamental to the effective functioning of a democracy. The alternatives are infinitely worse.
  • TheJezziahTheJezziah Posts: 660
    edited February 21

    Foxy said:

    FF43 said:

    SeanT said:

    FF43 said:

    TGOHF said:


    Corbyn has his fair share of skeletons, but I think he's on firm ground with the spy claims. Which, I believe, is why he is standing it.
    CHANGE IS COMING

    One of the best things about a Cotbyn premiership will be the end of the press barons.

    Let them dig salt.
    You want change (fair enough), but seem unconcerned about what that change might lead to.

    That's worrying, as change can always lead to worse outcomes. In this case, we have some good pointers. The Leveson recommendations - supported and encouraged by Labour - are not going to lead to a freer press. Worse, I don't even hear Corbyn going on about the need for a free press.

    But you also have to look closer. Corbyn is complaining about smears. His deputy is Tom Watson. An evil man - and I use that word purposefully - who willingly uses that same media to smear people with sexual abuse allegations whilst wearing a tinfoil-hat - though only about the opposition, not his own side. A man who also wants to mould the media to his party's own advantage.

    You may want a media shorn of 'media barons'. I'm unsure that you have fully considered whether this Labour team would replace those owners with something better for the country, or worse.
    Corbyn mentioned the need for a free press in the video posted on here.

    Watson was someone who wanted Corbyn removed and was not put in place by Corbyn, there is talk of him being replaced or his role weakened but the media is usually full of talk about Corbyn or his supporters up to various deeds to steal power so hard to know how much to read into it.

    That said even if Corbyn was a fan of Watson and he was considered the main man the idea that Watson is going to be able to mould the media as he see's fit, even if Labour win a massive majority comes off a bit conspiratorial.
  • TheJezziahTheJezziah Posts: 660
    If Trump actually does something positive about US gun laws then he deserves loads of credit. He is probably in a pretty unique position to be able to do something about it being a Republican but one with a different sort of support base.

    For all his negatives it would be really impressive if he actually makes progress on it.
  • NigelbNigelb Posts: 5,184

    If Trump actually does something positive about US gun laws then he deserves loads of credit. He is probably in a pretty unique position to be able to do something about it being a Republican but one with a different sort of support base.

    For all his negatives it would be really impressive if he actually makes progress on it.

    What is being proposed is pretty minimal.
    https://www.politico.com/story/2018/02/20/trump-guns-parkland-shooting-guns-417888
  • JosiasJessopJosiasJessop Posts: 19,334

    Corbyn mentioned the need for a free press in the video posted on here.

    Watson was someone who wanted Corbyn removed and was not put in place by Corbyn, there is talk of him being replaced or his role weakened but the media is usually full of talk about Corbyn or his supporters up to various deeds to steal power so hard to know how much to read into it.

    That said even if Corbyn was a fan of Watson and he was considered the main man the idea that Watson is going to be able to mould the media as he see's fit, even if Labour win a massive majority comes off a bit conspiratorial.

    Whilst Watson is in place, anything that Labour says or does about the media is suspect. He has smeared politicians from rival parties with the most heinous accusations, and is part of the same set-up as McBride et al (yet knew nothing about that hideous scheme). And he is near the heart of Labour (perhaps a rather atherosclerotic artery, diseased and ill).

    His own attitude to Labour politicians caught up in rumours and accusations is sadly somewhat different.

    And of course Watson will mould the media. He's been leading their campaign over it for years, and he and Corbyn seem step-to-step over the matter. He's their *expert*.

    I don't feel very sorry for Corbyn wrt 'smears' whilst he has Watson in any position of authority within his party. If he wants sympathy, he should clean up his own house first.
This discussion has been closed.