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david_herdson

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david_herdson
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  • Re: politicalbetting.com » Blog Archive » Local By-Election Review 2017 – how the parties have performed

    First?
  • Re: politicalbetting.com » Blog Archive » Ex-CON leadership favourite, DDavis, slips to just 6.6% chance

    It's very hard to determine who was best.

    Napoleon was a military genius, who committed dreadful political errors.

    Frederick the Great was a much less successful general, who was a political genius.

    Napoleon was a political genius too (indeed, one of his great legacies lies in domestic French politics), but wasn't an able diplomatist - but then that's not all that surprising if you think you can always fight yourself out of a tight spot.

    Interesting that Wellington came third - that two of the top three in a list spanning two and a half centuries or so were born in the same year and ultimately faced each other.
  • Re: politicalbetting.com » Blog Archive » Local By-Election Review : November 30th 2017 and November 201

    Every public servant's work Internet search history should be publicly available information. Anything not work related should require disciplinary action. Anything morally questionable should result in dismissal. Seems to be some people's idea of the precedent that should be set in the current bent copper case. Even if the public servant might have been set up by the bent coppers.
    Firstly, that's far too draconian. People couldn't even log onto pbc under that rule (!)

    But more seriously, the only people who should be able to dismiss a politician from office are his or her electorate or the courts (in practice, his or her party too, though they could still stand as an independent or for another party in that case).
  • Re: politicalbetting.com » Blog Archive » Today’s move against petrol and diesel vehicles will move the

    Chris Grayling bolloxed it up. That's no-one's fault but Chris Grayling's. The judgment today was eviscerating.
    Not for the first time, one does have to wonder why the government is either not getting proper legal advice, or is not following it. They really shouldn't be getting themselves into a position where they lose cases like this or the Article 50 case.
    The A50 case produced a split decision so the arguments must have been fairly finely balanced. In any case, the constitutional importance of that one was so significant that it was worth the government fighting it even if it thought it only had a 20% chance of winning, simply in order to clarify the law one way or the other (and in reality, its chances were probably a good deal better than that).

    What a government is allowed to do can often be a very grey area and it's not surprising that ministers will tend to push the boundaries of what might be acceptable because doing so enables them to put in place a solution that they hope will resolve whatever problem lies in front of them that day. Indeed, they have to do that because logically, the alternative is to seek permission from the courts before taking any action upon which there's any doubt (which will nearly always be the case).
  • Re: politicalbetting.com » Blog Archive » Macron still in 3rd place in French Presidential polling but i

    Just imagine how FURIOUS these Trump/May photos are making your dwindling circle of Guardian reading friends and allow yourself a chuckle.
    Chortle.

    This parliament has already seen off the Indy. Hopefully the Grauniad won't be long for this world.
    The Indy is still alive in digital form (and in cut-down 'i' form). Digital is the future of news reporting; weekly is the future of print (IMO, because it'll need to be quality and will therefore need to be not timely).

    I shall now disprove this by writing a quality piece for tomorrow in 30 minutes. Maybe.